<
Jungle Music Palms and Cycads Nursery

Nursery Hours:
Monday -Saturday 10AM-3PM

Phone: (619) 291-4605
Fax: (619) 574-1595
Email:
phil.bergman@junglemusic.net

  Delivery for palm trees and cycads is available

Delivery is available!

All major credit cards accepted 

                 

Home | Site Map | Palm Trees Directory | Cycads Directory | Directions                                                                             ../PalmTreesCycadPlantNurseryTour/holderbar20pix.gif

                                            PALM TREES AND CYCADS FOR SALE

NEW PALMS FOR SALE                                                                              

NEW PLANT ARRIVALS                                                                                   

PALMS, CYCADS AND TROPICAL PLANT BLOG                                            
down arrow   (SCROLL DOWN FOR LOTS OF PLANT PHOTOS   down arrow                                         

THIS PAGE HAS OLDER POSTS, JUNE , 2013                                          

REMINDER: POSTS HERE WILL UPDATE EVERY DAY OR TWO, SO RETURN FREQUENTLY
               TO SEE WHAT'S NEW.  AND, WATCH FOR OUR FAMOUS BLOG ONLY
"TEN DAY SPECIALS" BELOW.                                                           

HOW THIS BLOG WORKS
New plant arrivals, desirable species and requested plants included
New species described every few days, most recent posts at top of thread
Jump to older Blog Threads from links below
Blog discusses palm trees, cycads and tropical plants
LEARN ABOUT PALM TREES AND CYCADS
Brief comments given abut species presented
Information on sun requirements and cold tolerance given if available
Pictures of mature specimens shown when possible
In depth posts with lots of photos on some species
PRICING ON PLANTS SHOWN
On some plants, pricing given with the post
You can use quick link for all our prices:
 PALM PRICES   or    CYCAD PRICES
SPECIALS AND SALES
Specials below apply to visiting customers or mail orders unless stated otherwise
All specials have a termination date and always expire when the current thread expires
Ten Day specials expire ten days after date of posting and are marked in red color
For any sale prices, you must mention all Blog Only Sale Prices when purchasing
DIRECTIONS TO NURSERY
CLICK HERE for printable copy of directions
450 Oceanview Ave, Encinitas, CA 92024
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Phone: 619 291 4605
Email:  phil@junglemusic.net  or click here to email Phil 
MAIL ORDERS
 Available on most items, No international shipping
 Plants usually shipped in pot with soil
DELIVERIES
To almost anywhere within the continental U.S.
Utilize independent trucking services on any size plants

 WE ANSWER ALL EMAILS.  CLICK HERE TO CONTACT US:  EMAIL PHIL

 PRESENTLY YOU ARE AT OUR OLDER POST FROM JUNE 2013

Click below on dates for older posts:
May, 2013
April, 2013
March, 2013
February, 2013
January, 2013
December, 2012

November,2012
September-October, 2012

July-
August, 2012
May-June, 2012

March-April, 2012
January-February, 2012
November-December, 2011
September-October, 2011
June-August, 2011
   
    WE'RE PROUD   
Were proud of our over 9 million different website visitors.  Thanks to you all!
THANK YOU FOR CLICKING BELOW TO LIKE US ON facebook
We had to restart our counter with updates.  We were over 80,000

LOTS  OF GREAT DISCOUNTS WITH OUR BLOG ONLY SPECIALS LISTED BELOW!

 

SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013

 

THREE "CUTTING EDGE" NEW PALM SPECIES AVAILABLE IN OUR BAND SIZE!

 

LICUALA RADULA
AKA LICUALA DASYANTHA
EXOTIC MOTTLED FAN PALM WITH SOME COLD HARDINESS

About twenty years ago when word first came out that there was a mottled leaf, understory Licuala that had some degree of cold hardiness, there was quite the buzz.  We all knew of a similar miniature species, Licuala mapu, but this latter species basically had no chance of survival outdoors in Southern California.  At that time, the only chance of getting a Licuala radula was to obtain an actual little seedling that somehow made its way out of North Viet Nam and found its way to your locality.  You could probably count on your fingers the number of plants that were available in the US at that time.  Fortunately, the natural habitat of this species spreads up into China.  From that area and in recent years, a limited amount of seeds have been produced / obtained and to a very limited extent this species is now available.  In the wild, there has been tremendous pressure on this species from a conservation point of view because it is so beautiful.

It is an understory palm that gets to a height of about three feet with multiple stems.  Leaves are about eighteen inches wide.  It's individual segments create a circular appearing leaf.  But, the most striking characteristic are the mottled leaves with tones of dark green, lime green and sometimes yellow.  Individual segments are under two inches wide and these segments are the widest at their ends.  Note that, unlike other Licuala, this species is dioecious and you must have both sexes to set viable seed.  Shown here are two year old seedlings.  Very limited numbers are available.  It is a filtered light plant and cold hardiness is probably into the mid-thirties, perhaps a bit colder.  

One last comment: the name has recently been changed from "radula" to "dasyantha", although I prefer the old name.  Our availability of these gorgeous plants will probably be quite short-lived.  . .    
Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha)
Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha)
Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha)
photo by T.S. at RPS

 

BASSELINIA VELUTINA
UNBELIEVABLY RARE PALM!

This tyically "never seen" palm species is native to New Caledonia where it natively grows at an elevation of up to over 5000 feet.  The name "velutina" refers to the velvet tomentum on the crown shaft.  It is a medium to large species with a single trunk that can reach heights of thirty feet.  The crown shaft bulges larger than the trunk and is covered with gray hairs.  The leaves are eight feet long, arching and keeled in cross section.  Because of rarity, little is known about its culture, although it is said to be able to withstand a freeze.  We have only several small band sized plants.  
Basselinia velutina Basselinia velutina
Basselinia velutina Basselinia velutina Basselinia velutina by Daniel & Irène Létocart (le 01/01/1970
photo from Endemia.NC by Daniel & Irène Létocart

 

ACTINOKENTIA DIVARICATA WATERMELON
UNDERSTORY PALM WITH MARBLED TRUNK
 

We have previously talked about this thin trunked, slow growing species from New Caledonia and how it has cold hardiness well into the mid- to lower-twenties F.  In habitat, there is reportedly one small cluster of plants that have a "watermelon" crown shaft and lower crown.  You may  be familiar with the "watermelon" form of Chambeyronia.  Seeds recently became available and now you can purchase one of this variety of Actinokentia divaricata, watermelon form.  It is a filtered light plant and gets perhaps to a height of fifteen or twenty feet in a few decades.  It is being grown in colder areas such as the San Francisco Bay area and some gulf areas.  I wish to thank Tobias Spanner for his pictures showing the crown shaft "watermelon" appearance. 
Actinokentia divaricata watermelon Actinokentia divaricata watermelon
Actinokentia divariata
non-watermelon form
Actinokentia divaracata watermelon by TS at RPS
watermelon form by TS at RPS
Actinokentia divaracata watermelon by TS at RPS
watermelon form by TS at RPS

 

THE GENUS OF RAPHIA
PECULIAR PALMS WITH HUGE LEAVES

This is a very interesting yet bewildering genus of large plants with distribution from Africa, Madagascar and with one species in the Americas.  They are massive plants with one species having the longest leaves of any palm in the world.  Raphia regalis from Africa reportedly has leaves up to eighty feet long!  Most live in habitats of lower elevation, often swampy or wet.  With this said, surprisingly a few species seem to grow in Southern California.  Some species are single trunk, others suckering.  All have long upright leaves.  Leaflet edges are spiny, see photo.  I am going to make specific comments on three species here.  Heights below will probably not be reached in the average domestic garden in more temperate areas.

1.  Raphia farinifera:  Usually single trunk, sometimes suckers, from Central Africa, likes lots of water, takes sun in coastal areas, gets leaves to seventy feet with a long petiole.  Can take temperatures down to about a freeze.
2.  Raphia australis: Not from Australia, rather from Central Africa.  Lowland species.  Surprisingly, perhaps easier to grow than farinifera.  Sixty foot leaves, sometimes suckers, has interesting orange color to rachis and petiole. (see photos).  Similar growing traits.
3.  Raphia hookeri:  One of my favorites, I've never had for sale, from central western Africa, shorter leaves, usually single trunk.  Most interesting is the trunk which has Tillandsia or Spanish Moss type of fibers on its trunk.  Close up photos show this.  Once I got a hundred of the huge seeds of this species but couldn't get even one to germinate.  No growing data available.  Never been for sale.

Availability of Raphia is essentially zero.  We, on occasion, do have a few for sale. Shown are our 15g plants.
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia australis
Raphia australis
Raphia australis
Raphia australis
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri

 

ZAMIA FURFURACEA
THE CARDBOARD CYCAD

This species of cycad has this peculiar common name because of the thick, "cardboard-like" substance to the leaves.  The are thick, stiff and don't bend easily with pressure.  It is quite popular for several reasons.  First, it doesn't get very large.  The picture below with a woman standing in front of a specimen is about as large as you are ever going to see one.  A more typical height is three feet.  Secondly, it is basically unarmed.  There are no spines to deal with.  Third, it is fairly cold hardy and can take full sun if you are right along the coast.  All of these factors have made this species one of the most popular of the common cycads.  In the last photo, you can see how it does quite nicely as a patio plant. 

Native to Mexico, this cycad likes good draining soil and can tolerate temperatures into the mid to low twenties F.  Its leaves are 1.5 to 3 feet long.  There is variation in the size and shape of the leaflets.  Sometimes leaves are "coin shaped" and other times more elongated.  The seventh picture below even shows a "cupped" appearance to leaflets of a specimen we used to have.  You can see that we have plants for sale of all sizes up to boxed specimens.  In most areas, I think this species does best in part day sun.  In desert areas, shade will be needed.  Finally, Zamia furfuracea is an ideal choice for an interior house plant and has been used for decades for this purpose.  
Zamia furfuracea Zamia furfuracea
Zamia furfuracea Zamia furfuracea Zamia furfuracea
Zamia furfuracea Zamia furfuracea  Zamia furfuracea 
Zamia furfuracea  Zamia furfuracea  Zamia furfuracea 

 

DYPSIS PSAMMOPHILA
JUVENILE RED STEMS, LATER BLACK TRUNKS WITH WHITE CROWN SHAFTS

This is a small to medium sized, suckering palm from Eastern Madagascar.  It gets to a height of about 12 to 15 feet and the leaves are keeled.  When young, juvenile leaf stems and the base of the trunk have a prominent red color.  Later the trunks turn black or near black in color.  At the top of these dark stems are powder white crown shafts.  Shown here is a 5g plant demonstrating this prominent red color.  Other photos show the white crown shafts and dark trunks.  This is a filtered light species with cold tolerance into the upper twenties F. range.
Dypsis psammonphila Dypsis psammonphila
Dypsis psammonphila Dypsis psammonphila Dypsis psammophila by Arrowsmith at Palmpedia
by Phil Arrowsmith, PalmPedia
Dypsis psammophila Dypsis psammophila  

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

 

BUTIA BONNETTII
SHORTER BUTA - SUPER COLD HARDY

I just wanted to remind you folks in cold areas about this species (or variety) of Butia that doesn't get very tall and is cold hardy to somewhere between ten and fifteen degrees F.  It's mature height is ten to fifteen feete, its leaf color is blue green to blue and it loves hot sun.  We are fortunate to still have some 15g plants for sale.  These can be mail ordered right to your door.  They don't need much water and are near "bullet proof".   Shown here is our 15g sized plants.
Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii
Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii
Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii by Dennis Valdez

 

MACROZAMIA MONTANA
NEW SPECIES
MEDIUM SIZED AND COLD HARDY

This recently described species of Australia cycad is nice because it's not as big as Macroamia communis and is quite cold hardy.  I think it can tolerate temperatures into the upper teens F.  It likes full sun and good soil drainage.  The plant here is in a 20 gallon pot and super healthy looking.  We only have a few of these for sale.
Macrozamia montana Macrozamia montana
Macrozamia montana Macrozamia montana Macrozamia montana by paul kennedy and craig thompson, PACSOA
by Paul Kennedy and Craig Thompson, PACSOA

 

ENCEPHALARTOS LONGFOLIUS
A GREAT CYCAD FOR ANY GARDEN

Here at Jungle Music, we all love Encephalartos longifolius and consider it one of the best cycads you can add to your garden.  This morning I want to make a few points about this species.

1.  In the first photos I'm showing you three plants: a citrus pot size, a nice 15g and a boxed specimen.  You can see t he size progression in this pictures.  It will take you about five to seven years to go from the citrus pot to the 15g plant. From the 15g to the boxed size shown here will take about another ten years, perhaps a bit less.

2. 
E. longifolius leaves on occasion will curve toward the ground in a circular patter.  This might remind you how E. tripsinosus also does this.  Two photos below show how leaves can recurve downwards, sometimes over 180 degrees.

3.  Leaves on this species are often "stacked".  This means the leaflets line up like dominos, flat against each other.  Their orientation on the leaf stem makes them back to front as shown here.  Three pictures below show you this stacked nature of the leaflets.

4.  Leaflet color varies from dark green to blue and everything in between.  You might think that blue is the rare one.  Not so.  The last nursery plant shown is the darkest olive green you can imagine.  It's the hardest one to find. 

5.  This species loves sun in most localities and is a good growing species.  Cold tolerance is about 22 degrees but, with protection, you can grow it in areas that see more cold than this.

I highly recommend this species.  We have a size for everyone for sale.
Encephalartos longifolius
Citrus pot size
Encephalartos longifolius
citrus pot size
Encephalartos longifolius
citrus pot size
Encephalartos longifolius
15g plant, 8 inch caudex
Encephalartos longifolius
15g plant, 8 inch caudex
Encephalartos longifolius
15g plant, 8 inch caudex
Encephalartos longifolius
boxed specimen 16 inch caudex
Encephalartos longifolius
boxed specimen 16 inch caudex
Encephalartos longifolius
boxed specimen, 16 inch caudex
Encephalartos longifolius
recurved leaves
Encephalartos longifolius
recurved leaves
Encephalartos longifolius
stacked leaflets
Encephalartos longifolius
stacked leaflets
Encephalartos longifolius
stacked leaflets
Encephalartos longifolius
plant with blue leaves
Encephalartos longifolius
E. longifolius with blue leaves
Encephalartos longifolius
nursery plant with medium green leaves
Encephalartos longifolius
nursery specimen with dark olive green leaves
Encephalartos longifolius
nursery specimen with dark olive green leaves
Encephalartos longifolius
nursery specimen with dark olive green leaves

 

RECURVED OR ARCHED LEAVES OF ENCEPHALARTOS

In the last post, having touched on the subject of strongly arched leaves, I thought I'd shown you some more examples of leaves that are strongly recuved.  By this I mean leaves that curl downwards in a curcular fashion toward the ground.  We've seen plants do this is more than a 360 degree pattern.  The most common species where I've seen this phenomena is Encephalartos trispinosus, horridus, longifolius and arenarius.  Rarely you might see it on other species including lanataus, lehmanii and others.  When you have a plant that really shows this curve, it'll probably be one of your favorite plants. 
RECURVE E. LONGIFOLIUS
E. longifolius
E. longifolius recurve
E. longifolius
E. horridus
E. horridus
E. longifolius
E. longifolius
E. trispinosus
E. trispinosus
E. trispinosus
E. trispinosus
E. horridus box
E. horridus
e. horridus
E. horridus
E. horridus
E. horridus
   

 

 

SABAL XTEXENSIS
SUPER COLD HARDY NATIVE HYBRID SABAL

This is a distinct Sabal that is native to the Brazoria County, Texas and is often called the "Brazoria Palm" by Texans.  It is felt to be a native cross between Sabal minor and Sabal mexicana.  Its leaves are blue green, it gets to about twenty feet in height, has a very thick trunk up to two feet in diameter, and is extremely cold hardy.  There are reports that it may tolerate temperatures below ten degrees F.  Shown her is a 5g plant.  Note the leaf color and the markings on the petiole.  The last picture is the only mature one I found and was taken by an unknown photographer.  This is not a common palm and I don't have one in my garden.  But, when I talk to cold hardy palm enthusiasts, they get quite excited about this palm   
Sabal xtensis Sabal xtexensis
Sabal Xtexensis Sabal Xtexensis Sabal xtexensis unkinown photographer
unknown photographer

 

HEDYCHIUM GARDNERIANUM
THE KAHILI GINGER
HUGE FRAGRANT YELLOW  FLOWER

I have always had a fondness for Hedychium gingers.  Not only are they reasonably cold hardy, but they don't get too big and have the most gorgeous upright blossoms.  The last photo to the right was taken about six weeks ago when I told you about this species.  Now look at the same plant in blossom!  These blossoms last for weeks and are very nicely fragrant.  This is a filtered light species.  You can see that it hardly ever gets over six feet.  A hard freeze may knock back the foliage, but they recover nicely.  BTW, some people call this the Kahili Ginger, others call it Hawaiian Ginger.  There are different types of Hedychium, but they all have upright blossoms.  Contrast this with the dependent Shell Ginger group.  We only have a few Kahilis left. 
Hedychium gardnerianum Hedychium gardnerianum
Hedychium gardnerianum Hedychium gardnerianum Hedychium gardnerianum

 

BRAHEA NITIDA
TREE POT SIZE NOW AVAILABLE

It is difficult to locate this single trunk, fan palm from Mexico.  One of the things I remember most about this species are the flat, glossy green leaves.  If grown in less than full sun, the color is very dark and the leaves have almost a tropical, flat "Licuala-look".  This species is cold hardy into the upper teens.  In most areas you can grow it in sun or filtered light.  I've even grown one if shade with just a little dappled light.  They potentially can get up to 25 to 30 feet in many decades.  They like good draining soil. I'd say rate of growth is slow.

We recently got in this tree pot size (4x4x14 inch pot) and they are available for sale.  This pot is a great size to ship because it goes in a small box at an affordable rate.  I'd say it's like a small 5g size.  The habitat photo below was taken by a friend of mine, Justen Dobbs.
Brahea nitida Brahea nitida
Brahea nitida
four plants together in a larger pot
Brahea nitida Brahea nitida
Brahea nitida Brahea nitida by Justen Dobbs
Habitat photo by Justen Dobbs
Brahea nitida

 

CHAMAEDOREA MICROSPADIX
A VERY COLD HARDY BAMBOO PALM

Like Chamaedorea radicalis, this is another quite cold hardy Chamaedorea.  It is known to do quite well in various areas in Northern California.  However, this species is not single trunk but rather a suckering species with multiple very thin trunks.  I've seen specimens where the trunk diameter is no greater than the standard pencil.  For a suckering species, it is also not too tall.  Typically this species gets up to seven, perhaps eight feet.  It is not uncommon on mature trees to see some trunks leaning out from the center of the plant, gently reaching upwards.  Leaf color is green, but on some plants there is an iridescent gray discoloration to the leaves or even a glaucous white backside to the leaflets.  Female plants produce pretty clusters of red seeds.  This plant looks it's best in filtered light and has a cold tolerance into the upper teens.  I've seen very nice specimens in the San Francisco Bay area.  This Mexican species' name implies that the blossom is "small", which is not the case.  Our photos here show a 15g plant with views of a flower.  Note the very thin trunks shown here.  This plant will fill in over time and have a dozen or two trunks when mature.  On the fourth photo, not the sheen to the leaves, typical of some strains of this species.
Chamaedorea microspadix 15g Chamaedorea microspadix leaf
Chamaedorea microspadix trunks Chamaedorea microspadix iridescent Chamaedorea microspadix garden

 

CARYOTA URENS
FISHTAIL PALM, TALL, FAIRLY COLD HARDY

Caryota are a genus, and all are a type of Fishtail Palm.  This species is single trunk.  It is monocarpic.  This means that, after about two decades, the plant flowers and dies.  Caryota urens makes a very tall tree and is extremely fast growing.  In Southern California it is the fastest of any palm in terms of vertical growth.  It is considered the ultimate species for forming canopy.  Its trunk matures to a height of fifty feet or more and is about 18 inches thick.  It will get taller and has a thinner trunk than the presently popular species, Caryota gigas

Shown here to the right is an exceptional 25g Caryota urens.  (we'll discuss C. gigas soon).  It is about 18 feet tall.  This species likes full sun and is cold hardy to 20 degrees F, or perhaps a bit lower. We also have nice 15g plants as shown below.  The second photo to the right shows two palms, mature, in an Encinitas garden.  Below is a series of Caryota urens planted at the Catamaran Hotel in San Diego.  These plants were fairly short lived because they were field grown and then dug.  Digging triggers the life cycle of Caryotas and threw these palms into blossom.  Unfortunately, the landscape people were unaware of this at the time they purchased and dug these trees.   The last photo is of a mature tree in Balboa Park, San Diego.

For those wishing to establish a canopy, this is one of the best species you can plant.  They are fast, have large leaves and throw good shade below.  The cold hardiness of Caryota urens is into the upper teens F.  I've found it to be the most reliable and cold hardy of all Caryota species.
Caryota urens 25g Caryota urens
Caryota urens Caryota urens 15g Caryota urens Balboa park

 

MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2013

 

SABAL URSESANA
COLD HARDY BLUE SABAL
TEN DAY SPECIAL CITRUS POT SIZE


This single trunk blue fan palm comes from northern Mexico.  In fact, I've even heard reports that isolated populations may cross into the United States.  It has a medium to thick trunk, typically twelve to eighteen inches in diameter.  Also, it has long petioles and blue leaves.  It loves hot sun, even in the desert.  I've always told people this is about a 20 degree F. plant.  But, this weekend I had a palm enthusiast visit us from Arkansas.  He says that his uresana is more cold hardy than riverside, bermudana or other similar Caribbean species.  He told me it tolerated temperatures into the mid-teens F.  So, who knows, perhaps it is a good choice if you're in a very cold area.

REGULAR PRICE CITRUS POT $65
TEN DAY SPECIAL $45


You must mention this Blog Only Special to get this price.  These plants can easily be shipped right to your door.
Sabal urssana Sabal ursesana by JS
In habitat, photo by J.S.

 

BRAHEA ACULEATA
SINALOA HESPER PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL TREE POT SIZE


This fan palm is also from Sonora, Mexico.  For a Brahea, the trunk is rather thin at eight inches.  Overall height can reach up to thirty feet.  The crown of leaves is somewhat open.  Petioles arre several feet long and the leaf color is bue-green.  Petioles tend to show some blue color and have small spines.  This palm has reasonable cold hardiness, most likely into the upper teens F. and  is drought tolerant.  It is a full sun species.

REGULAR PRICE TREE POT SIZE $50
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE $35


You must mention this Blog Only Special when purchasing.
Brahea aculeata Brahea aculeata

 

BRAHEA EDULIS
THE GUADALUPE FAN PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL 5G SIZE


This highly sought after species of Mexican Brahea is prized because it is not an overly tall palm and has a compact crown of leaves.  Plants that are thirty years old are hardly even more than ten feet tall.  The trunk is thick with very tight cracks or checks on the surface as seen below.  Grwoth rate is very slow.  This species is unique in that the only native habitat is the Island of Guadalupe off the coast of Baja, Mexico.  There, specimens can reach heights of thirty feet, but this would take about a half of century to accomplish.  The photos below show very old plants at Mission Bay, San Diego.  This species tolerates ocean spray.  We're offering super nice 5g plants on special.

REGULAR PRICE 5G SIZE $65
TEN DAY SPECIAL $45


Just mention this special when purchasing to get this price.
Brahea edulis Brahea edulis
Brahea edulis Brahea edulis Brahea edulis

 

ENCEPHALARTOS FEROX
AFRICAN CYCAD WITH RED CONE
TEN DAY SPECIAL BARE ROOT SEEDLINGS


This is a shade tolerant South African species that has "holly fern" like leaves.  When mature, both male and female cones are very colorful.  The female is particularly nice and can be fire engine red.  This species forms a small trunk and is never over eight feet in overall height.  Along the coast it tolerates full sun but most gardeners grow it in filtered light.  Cold tolerance is the low 20's F.  We are offering a great buy on our bare root seedlings.

REGULAR PRICE BARE ROOT SEEDLINGS $30
TEN DAY SPECIAL $20 EACH OR THREE FOR $40


You must mention this special to get this price.
Encephalartos ferox Encephalartos ferox
boxed specimen
Encephalartos ferox
photo from Wikipedia
Encephalartos ferox Encephalartos ferox

 

CARYOTA GIGAS
EXOTIC FISHTAIL PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL 15G SIZE


This tropical appearing Fishtail Palm is native to northern Thailand.  It is fast growing and gets a very thick base.  Overall height is about 35 feet.  Cold tolerance is typically into the low 20's F., perhaps a bit lower.  Leaves are long and wide, sometimes up to fourteen feet long.  It is a monocarpic species and lives about fifteen years..  We are offering nice 15g plants on special.

REGULAR PRICE 15G $175
TEN DAY SPECIAL THI SIZE $150


You must mention this Blog Only Special to get this price.
cARYOTA GIGAS cARYOTA GIGAS

 

STANGERIA ERIOPUS
RARE DWARF AFRICAN CYCAD
TEN DAY SPECIAL CITRUS POT SIZE


Enthusiasts love this species for a lot of reasons.  It is small, never over about four feet tall.  It is also quick growing with attractive fern like leaves.  It also tolerates filtered light or coastal sun and is easy to "sneak into" that small open area on the garden floor.  We are offering citrus pot plants at an excellent price.  This species is CITES protected and endangered in the wild.  Mature leaf length is three feet.  This species is easy to cone and you might want to consider getting a male and female plant so you can help conserve this great species.  If available, I can select sexes for you..

REGULAR PRICE CITRUS POT SIZE $175
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE $145

Very limited supplies on this rare species.  You must mention this Blog Only Special when purchasing.
sTANGERIA ERIOPUS sTANGERIA
Stangeria eriopus Stangeria eriopus  
     

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 23, 2013

 

BRAHEA CLARA
BLUE BRAHEA THAT TOLERATES HUMIDITY BETTER
FIFTEEN GALLON & CIT POT SIZES


It's not often that you see Brahea clara for sale.  This is because it is not grown domestically in large numbers and collecting wild seeds is difficult.  It is native to Sonora, Mexico.  This "species" has always been a bit of a confusion for collectors.  Some argue that it's a natural hybrid of Brahea armata; perhaps with B. brandegeei.  Others think it's a variety of B. armata.  Others argue it should be it's own species because of the differences it displays from the regular Mexican Blue Fan Palm.  It does look different as described below.

First off, Brahea clara is a species that is faster growing than Brahea armata and felt by many to better tolerate the humidity seen in the SE United States.   It is a blue species but sometimes the blue has some green in it.  The petioles are longer and the leaves are less stiff.  Sometimes the leaves are even droopy at their ends.  It has a more open appearance compared to the armata and is less compact.  If you live in an area that has heat and humidity, you may want to consider this species.  It's a sun plant and cold hardy into the mid-teens F.  When grown well it is a stunning blue fan palm.

We presently have 15g and citrus pot sizes available.  Both sizes can be shipped.
Brahea clara Brahea clara
Brahea clara Brahea clara Brahea clara
Brahea clara Brahea clara Brahea clara by TS at RPS
photo c/o TS at RPS

 

 "DWARF" BUTIA PALM
A SMALL BLUE BUTIA THAT IS A PUZZLE TO US

About three months ago we got in a hand full of 15g plants that were sold to us as "Butia dwarfs".  A grower had a batch of these and, after many years, got them up to fifteen gallon plants.  But, they were not fast growing like a regular Butia and didn't seem to achieve their anticipated size.  So, that frustrated grower sold them to another grower.  This second grower found the same thing.  This batch of "Butia" just stayed small and didn't respond to normal culture.  This second grower contacted me to ask if I was interested.  And, of course, I was.

Shown here is an assortment of pictures of several of these plants.  Remember, these were supposed to be regular Butia capitata but just haven't proven to be that.  They are certainly different than the Pindo Palm.  The abnormal leaf tips might suggest hybridization.  But, with what?  As far as I know, they were not intentionally hybridized and the entire batch are all looking quite similar.  If it was a chance (natural) hybridization, you'd expect some to appear more normal Pindo appearing.  They definitely have some blue in their stems and leaves.  The leaves ar keeled.  Leaf tips are folded and differently shape in a way. 

So, what are they?  I'm not quite sure.  If I were to guess, I'd go with some kind of hybrid.  We only have a limited number of 15g of these peculiar plants. If you like plants where you have to grow it to see what you've got, this "guessing game" plant might be perfect for you.  We've grown many Butia X Jubaea in the past, and these are not the same as them.  Butia X Jubaea are vigorous growers and, in my experience not "dwarfed" or "stunted".  But, who knows on this one?  I will predict that it is not going to make a very large mature plant.
Butia dwarf Butia dwarf
Butia dwarf Butia dwarf Butia dwarf
Butia dwarf Butia dwarf Butia dwarf

 

CARYOTA SPECIES IN 15G
CAME IN AS "OBTUSA" BUT WHAT IS IT REALLY?

In this post and the next, I want to discuss how taxonomic names can be quite confusing to all of us.  About twenty years ago, Caryota gigas was introduced.  It was first called Caryota "Thai Mountain Giant" by seed collectors.  Soon thereafter it was given the name "Caryota obtusa" by people trying to be more scientific.  Nurserymen gave it such names as "Caryota King Kong" and "Caryota Black Stem".  Then, in the late 90's, Don Hodel named it Carytoa gigas and that has stuck.

But, what is the true "obtusa".  Taxonomists tell us that there is such a thing.  Some growers still call C. gigas by the original name "obtusa".  I bring this up because we got in some 15g single trunk Caryotas that were called "obtusa" by the grower.  They certainly are not C. gigas.  To me they look more like a Caryota ochlandra at this point because of the black fuzz on the base of the petiole.   These plants will be super aggressive single trunk palms, ideal for Southern California.  Just to clarify, in order to call them Caryota urens, I usually look for the fat terminal leaflet at the end of the leaf.  On these I don't see it. 

So, right now, I don't know exactly what to call these nice palms.  On the internet people are still arguing about what this "obtusa" is.  Palm specialists in Thailand still claim there is a central Thai species of Caryota that will prove to be the true C. obtusa.  And, it's distribution may extend from Thailand into Burma and India.  But, I don't this this palm is what they are referring to.  Certainly, more field work is needed on this genus.

Please see the next post for a historical point about "Caryota obtusa".
Caryota obtusa Caryota obtusa
Caryota obtusa Caryota obtusa Caryota obtusa
     

 

AMAZING CARYOTA IN SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA
LABELED "CARYOTA OBTUSA", ITS SEEN A LOT OF COLD WEATHER

Having just mentioned in the post above the confusion with species names in the world of Caryotas, I thought I'd share an interesting palm with you.  A customer and acquaintance (J.H.) in Sacramento and I have been talking for years about a Caryota in central Sacramento that seems to be thriving and doing quite well.  It's been there for at least an estimated ten years.  After much prompting, J.H. took and emailed me some photos of a great looking palm from Capitol Park in Sacramento, CA.  In case you don't know this city, it's the capitol of California and in Northern California, a long distance inland.  It's been known to see temperatures into the teens F. routinely. In the city itself, some argue that the buildings may give some "inner city" heat to combat the cold. 

When my friend told me about this Caryota, I assumed it would be C. urens because urens is the most cold hardy Fishtail species around.  But, it's not.  To my eyes it looks like Caryota gigas.  My experience and feedback on Caryota gigas is that it's low tolerance is 22 degrees F.  This specimen might lower that temperature estimate. 

Because this plant was obtained many years ago, it has a name plaque saying "Caryota obtusa".  If you remember above, gigas first came in as "obtusa".  My guess is that the city got this palm in those early years and this represents the nomenclature confusion that existed at that time.

But, what a beautiful palm to see in super cold Northern California.  I thank J.H., as all of these photos were taken by him.
Caryota gigas Sacramento CA by JH Caryota gigas Sacramento CA by JH
Caryota gigas Sacramento CA by JH Caryota gigas Sacramento CA by JH Caryota gigas Sacramento CA by JH
Caryota gigas Sacramento CA by JH    

 

CYCAS CURRANII
EXOTIC SPECIES, PALAWAN, PHILIPPINES

This tropical appearing green cycad produces a tall stem up to thirty feet or more, one to two feet in diameter. It is reported that this species attains a size and stature similar to surrounding trees in habitat.  Leaves are six to eight feet with armed, long petioles.  Leaf width is about two feet.  Leaves are flat, slightly flexing toward the ground and occasionally a bit undulating.  To the touch, the leaves are rather soft and inviting.  Seeds are quite large with raised edges on the sclerotesta (hard inner layer of the seed below the fruit).  Cycas wadei is the only other Cycas species with ridged sclerotesta but it comes from the island of Wadei and the seeds are much smaller.  This makes an attractive landscape specimen cycad. 

I have been growing this species for about ten years and found that it does quite well in Southern California.  I have a few gorgeous 15g plants for sale.  They would prefer part day sun or strong filtered light.  Cold tolerance appears to be into the mid-twenties F.  
Cycas curranii Cycas curranii
Cycas curranii Cycas curranii Cycas curranii
Cycas curranii Cycas curranii PACSOA by George Yao
From PACSOA by George Yao
Cycas curranii PACSOA by George Yao
From PACSOA by George Yao

 

ZAMIA PORTORICENSIS
A CARIBBEAN DWARF CYCAD

This is a dwarf cycad from Puerto Rico that has very small caudexes, rarely over four inches, with sort leaves, typically under 3 feet.  They cluster freely.  The leaves are green and either flat or with a minimal amount of keeling.  Compared to similar Zamia species, these are unique in that the leaflets are longer and have minimal or no spines. They can tolerate coastal sun but require sun protection far inland.  Cold tolerance is thought to be in the mid-twenties F.  (little cold tolerance data).  This is a good cycad where there is very limited space available.  It can be grown as a patio potted cycad.
Zamia portoricensis Zamia portoricensis
Zamia portoricensis Zamia portoricensis Zamia portoricensis
Zamia portoricensis    

 

 

DIOON RZEDOWSKII
RARE CYCAD FROM SOUTHERN MEXICO

This medium to large cycad comes from an elevation of 2100 to 2800 ft. in mountainous regions of the Sierra de Oaxaca.  It most closely resembles Dioon spinulosum that comes from lower elevations under 1000 feet.  It is also similar to Dioon mejiae from Honduras.  It would not be difficult to confuse these three species as they are all somewhat similar appearing.  Of these three species, Dioon rzedowskii is by far the most rare.

Trunk height can reach fifteen feet.  This species usually does not branch but does recline with age.  Trunk diameter is under 16 inches.  Leaves are leathery, glossy green and about five feet long.  When emerging, they are quite tomentous (hairy) and after maturation the leaves are flat.  Leaf color is green, but not quite as shiny as Dioon spinulosum.  Leaf margins when young have quite prominent spines which are more prominent compared to spinulosum and a bit more of a yellow color than the latter (see photo #7 below).  When the plants mature, most of these spines are lost, but a few may remain (first photo, last row below).  The last photo shows a seedling that germinated in habitat. 

Along the coast here this species does best with part day sun or strong filtered light.  It can tolerate full sun but tends to be more lime green with full sun exposure.  Inland areas would demand filtered light.  Shown here is an assortment of nursery plants in various sizes.  The habitat photos of mature plants here were all donated by a friend and cycad enthusiast John Otto.  Cold tolerance is into the mid to low-twenties F.  Of note, this species has extremely large seeds.
Dioon rzedowskii Dioon rzedowskii
Dioon rzedowskii Dioon rzedowskii Dioon rzedowskii
Dioon rzedowskii Dioon rzedowskii Dioon rzedowskii habitat by JO
Dioon rzedowskii habitat by JO Dioon rzedowskii habitat JO Dioon rzedowskii habitat JO
Dioon rzedowskii habitat JO Dioon rzedowskii habitat JO Dioon rzedowskii habitat JO

 

ZAMIA CUPATIENSIS
ESSENTIALLY UNKNOWN SPECIES FROM COLUMBIA

I was fortunate enough to have a few seedlings of a cycad that essentially has never been sold in the United States nor is it in any major botanical gardens.  It comes from an extremely remote location in Columbia.  Information in books and on the Internet is essentially nonexistent.  Loran Whitelock, in his reference book on cycads, gives a description of this species but admits he has never seen a mature plant.  He describes it as a distinct species and not the same as Zamia ulei which comes from Brazil.  Some would consider these two species synonymous. Whitelock describes this as a small species with a subterranean trunk that has leaves two feet in length.  Leaflets are six to eight inches long and margins are not spiny.  I have been only able to find one photograph of a larger plant taken by Dennis Stevenson.  I cannot comment on cold tolerance because of my lack of experience but would suggest greenhouse culture for now in filtered light.  I'll probably never have this species available again and only have a few.    

Zamia cupatiensis Zamia cupatiensis
Zamia cupatiensis Zamia cupatiensis by Stevenson
photo by Dennis Stevenson
 

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

 

FIRST DAY OF SUMMER SALE!
TODAY, FRIDAY AND TOMORROW SATURDAY
15% OFF EVERYTHING!

Here at Jungle Music, all of us love summer.  The weather is great, days are long and all the plants are booming.  In celebration of this, the first day of summer, we are offering 15% off all purchases both today and tomorrow.  This discount applies to our entire plant inventory.  It does not apply to plants already discounted or on special. 

This discount also applies to mail orders placed today or tomorrow.  So, if you want something special for your garden, either visit us or give us a call.  We have more plant inventory than at any time in our 36 year history.
palms monarch area
cycad alley palms cycad alley
tropical color E. arenarius palm trees
cycads tropical plants palm trees

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2013

 

ENCEPHALARTOS ARENARIUS
JUST IN, NICE 5G SIZE PLANTS
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE


We just got in a limited number of very healthy, outdoor grown Encephalartos arenarius.  These plants are the "blue-green" variety and will take on a lot of blue when mature and out in full sun.  This species is from the Republic of South Africa.  Trunk size is usually under three to four feet at maturity.  Crown width averages five feet or so.  They resemble an E. horridus in a way, but a little less spiny on the leaf margins.  They are a good growing species and prefer full sun along the coast.  But, they will tolerate part day sun, especially inland.  Cold hardiness is about 22 degrees F.  These 5g plants (first four photos here) are about five years old.

REGULAR PRICE THIS 5G SIZE $175
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS BATCH $125


You must mention this Blog Only Special to get this price.  These are an easy mail order plant.  
Encephalartos arenarius 5g Encephalartos arenarius 5g
Encephalartos arenarius 5g Encephalartos arenarius 5g Encephalartos arenarius
In time these 5g will grow into plant like this

 

ENCEPHALARTOS CAFFER
JUST IN: 5G PLANTS OF THE DESIRABLE PLUMOSE FORM
TEN DAY SPECIAL THESE 5G PLANTS!


Although I only got in several of this hard to find species, I am offering them on special.  Encephalartos caffer is a dwarf grassland species from the Eastern Cape region of South Africa.  Leaves are usually under three feet and the stem stays small.  It loves full sun and is easy to grow.  We've found there are two forms in terms of leaf appearance.  One form has a more traditional flatter leaf  and another with more plumose leaves.  The plants we have on special are this more plumose form with fluffy leaves.  We feel that this is the form one should seek out.  You can see the plumose nature in the photos.  Cold tolerance is about 22 degrees F.  They are easy to old protect because they are always small.  These are easy to mail order.

REGULAR PRICE 5G SIZE $300
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE, THIS BATCH, $185


You must mention this Blog Only special to get this price and remember: I only have a few of these for sale at this price.
Encephalartos caffer 5g Encephalartos caffer 5g
Encephalartos caffer 5g Encephalartos caffer 5g Encephalartos caffer by R. Smit, PACSOA
photo by R. Smit from PACSOA

 

ALOE PICATILIS
SMALLER FAN TYPE OF ALOE
RARE SPECIES, NICE 5G PLANT


As most of you know, we are not a succulent grower.  But, I do bring in succulents that I find particularly charming and offer such plants to our customers.  Today I am presenting such a plant.  This species is known as a "Fan Aloe".  And, it is also a semi-dwarf species.  Like the Encephalartos cycads, it is native to the Republic of South Africa.  It is known for the unusual arrangement of it's blue fleshy leaves as shown here.  It leaves are thick and fleshy.  Trunks can fork making a multi-stem mature plant.  Plant heights are usually under six feet but native plants in the wild (perhaps a hundred years old) can reach heights of ten feet.

The plant shown here is an older and stocky five gallon plant with multiple heads and a branched stem.  A friend of mine propagates and grows these, so I decided that, for those  of you who like smaller blue plants, I'd offer this species for sale.  It demands full sun and, because it's so slow growing, be careful not to allow adjacent and faster growing plants to shade it out.  The last photo from Wikipedia shows a mature forked trunk plant in blossom.  This is also an easy to mail order plant.
Aloe plicatilis Aloe plicatilis
Aloe plicatilis Aloe plicatilis Aloe picatilis Wikipedia
photo mature plant from Wikipedia

 

TRACHYCARPUS FORTUNEI
THE CHINESE WINDMILL PALM
 

This species, sometimes referred to as just the "Windmill Palm", is from China and one of the most cold hardy of all palm species.  There are enthusiasts from areas such as Ohio and parts of New York that are keeping them alive outdoors during the winter.  It is a single trunk palm with a furry trunk.  In time, this trunk's mat and hair will fall off to produce a cleaner trunk.  The crown is small, especially in hot intense sun.  It stretches out in strong filtered light or part day sun.  But, too much shade may kill this species.  It's leaves are about three feet across.  Leaf shape in nearly circular with divided segments.  Trunk height depends on the age of the tree.  This species is usually under twenty feet tall, but very old specimens (see below) can reach heights of over 30 feet.  Shown here are several good sized boxed plants and a 5g plant.  Most of our mail order customers prefer the 5g size for shipping.  Leaf stems are minimally armed with very small barbs.  Overall, it is quite a user-friendly species and is great for smaller gardens.  We do sell all sizes of this very easy-to-grow species.  
Trachycarpus fortunei  Trachycarpus fortunei 
Trachycarpus fortunei  Trachycarpus fortunei  Trachycarpus fortunei 
Trachycarpus fortunei  Trachycarpus fortunei  Trachycarpus fortunei 
Trachycarpus fortunei  Trachycarpus fortunei  Trachycarpus fortunei 

 

CHAMAEDOREA RADICALIS
TRUNKING AND DWARF FORM

This attractive species of Chamaedorea comes in two distinct forms.  One is a dwarf form; the other trunks and the plant gets to a height of eight to ten feet.  The dwarf form reaches a height of three, sometimes four feet.  This is a single trunk Chamaedorea that is quite remarkable for several reasons.  First, it takes up very little space and fits nicely into small areas of the floor of the garden.  Second, it is one of the most cold hardy of the Chamaedorea group, taking temperatures into the upper teens.  Third, it can tolerate some sun; it doesn't demand full shade.  Another cool thing are the blossoms.  Female blossoms reach above the leaves, are orange in color and develop large black seeds.  They are easy to pollinate and, if you plant a small colony of males and females, are almost certain to get viable seeds.  Shown here is a 5g plant.  We have a pretty good supply of both this form.

The trunking form gets up to about 8 feet of height. In previous years, this was hard to find.  Its trunk is thin.  Leaves of the trunking form look a little bit different and are thinner and longer.  Shown below are two photos of the trunking form.   
Chamaedorea radicalis, 5g Chamaedorea radicalis 5g
Chamaedorea radicalis leaf Chamaedorea radicalis trunk Chamaedorea radicalis garden
CHAMAEDOREA RADICALIS TRUNKING CHAMAEDOREA RADICALIS  

 

ARCHONTOPHOENIX "TERACARPA"
THE BEST KING PALM EVER!
AVAILABLE NOW!

I've previously discussed this great palm but want to remind new readers about it.  First of all, for all you budding palm taxonomists, I should mention that the name above is a fictitious common name.  We came up with this name because the derivation of "tera" is "monster" and "carpa" refers to body.  And, this perfectly describes the palm I'm discussing here this morning.

In my own garden in San Diego, I have one Archontophoenix palm that is distinctly different from another others I have grown.  I do not recall the original seed source for this palm and didn't appreciate it until it displayed its amazing traits.  Here are some of its characteristics:

1.  It is much taller than Archontophoenix cunninghamiana.  It towers overhead adjacent King Palms.
2.  It has an extremely thick trunk diameter, 2 to 3 times thicker than the average King Palm.
3.  Impressively, there is a  LACK OF BROWN TIPPING TO THE LEAVES in full sun.  In my garden, other King species in full sun have brown tipped leaflets.
4.  It has a large and elongated yellow-blue crown shaft, different than another other Archontophoenix I've grown.
5.  It produces larger seeds than regular King Palms but smaller than A. purpurea.  They are red in color.
6.  There is a slight silver color to the back of the leaves.  7.  In full sun, the leaves are DARKER GREEN in color than regular King Palms.
8.  It has an extremely fast growth rate

We have long considered this to be am Archontophoenix maxima.  I've mentioned this ad this Blog.  But, it's not identical to A. maxima we've grown at our nursery from reliable seed sources in Australia.

So, we simply call it Archonotophoenix "teracarpa".  We have 2 and 5g sizes available.  I'm showing a 5g double plant here.  Photos of the large tree here are of the actual tree in my garden that has produced the "teracarpa" seeds.  At present, I'd estimate its height at forty to fifty feet.  If you like King Palms, you can't do better than this one.        
Archontophoenix "teracarpa"

Archontophoenix "teracarpa"
Archontophoenix "teracarpa"

Archontophoenix "teracarpa"
Archontophoenix "teracarpa" Archontophoenix "teracarpa" Archontophoenix "teracarpa"
Archontophoenix "teracarpa"
Note that it towers over adjacent other  King Palms,
darker green in color, no brown tipping or yellowing
Archontophoenix "teracarpa" Archontophoenix "teracarpa"
Archontophoenix "teracarpa"
Archontophoenix "teracarpa"
Archontophoenix "teracarpa"

 

TREE FERNS AVAILABLE
ASSORTED SIZES, SPECIES

Our nursery does not specialize in ferns.  But, for some reason, we have accumulated a nice selection of good sized Tree Ferns in 15g and 25 gallon size.  Some of these have up to four feet of trunk.  These include Cyathea cooperi. and other species.  My favorite has always been the Brentwood Tree Fern.  It has no known native habitat.  I've used it in my garden and now have trunks about forty feet tall.  Check out the pictures below of this variety.  We occasionally have a few of these available.

Tree ferns, in general, are considered water-loving, filtered light plants.  But, some species can tolerate full coastal sun.  Some species tolerate temperatures well into the twenties F. and there's lots of tree ferns growing up  in northern California.  Remember, many species come from cool areas of New Zealand and southern Australia.  Blended in with palms and other tropicals, I think they look great and give a nice effect.  Their only downside is the "itchy" fibers from the leaves that fall when you clean off dead leaves.  But, overall, they are worth it because of their very cool appearance.    
Tree Fern Tree Fern
Tree Fern Tree Fern Tree Fern
Tree Fern Tree Fern Tree Fern
Tree Fern Tree Fern
Brentwood Tree Fern in foreground near Howea
Tree Fern Wikipedia photo
photo by Wikipedia Website

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013

 

RHOPALOSTYLIS BAUERI
HUGE 5 GALLON PLANTS
MULTIPLES, SIX TO EIGHT FEET TALL

This species of Shaving Brush Palm is known as the Norfolk Island Palm and is native to that Island as well as possibly other islands in the area.  It is a coastal sun or inland filtered light palm that gets to a height of about thirty feet or higher. I've found that the petioles are more of a rust-brown color compared to the silver-gray of R. sapida.  It also has more relaxed and less upright leaves than sapida as well. 

Shown here are some amazing 5g plants that we just got in and that are ten years old and still in 5 gallon pots!  Most are multiples.  Some reach up to eight feet in their pots. They were grown in coastal San Diego County sun and were not rooted into the ground.  They were grown on grow mats and have intact roots out the bottom holes.  We have potted most of these into larger containers as they were tearing apart the pots.  But, we have retained a few to sell as 5g plants.  They cost more than our regular 5 gallon size but are three times bigger.  And, they can be mail ordered right to you door.  The last photo was taken in Balboa Park n San Diego.
Rhopalostylis baueri 5g Rhopalostylis baueri 5g
Rhopalostylis baueri 5g Rhopalostylis baueri 5g Rhopalostylis baueri 5g
Rhopalostylis baueri 5g Rhopalostylis baueri 5g Rhopalostylis bauer

 

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013

 

ENCEPHALARTOS CONCINNUS
MEDIUM SIZED GREEN CYCAD FROM ZIMBABWE AND MOZAMBIQUE

This rare species of green cycad develops a trunk up to about ten feet although there are reports of specimens with trunks as tall as eighteen feet.  It has several distinct populations dispersed through Mozambique and Zimbabwe in open forest localities.  It was first described in 1969 by Dyer and Vanderoon and belongs to the "Manikensis Complex".  It was separated out as a distinct species because of the characteristic of its cone and leaves.  It holds a full crown of green leaves five to six feet long.  Leaflets are crowded, often overlapping.  There's two interesting things about the leaflets.  The do not come to a sharp pointed end and are often a bit blunted.  Also, the surface of the leaflets is bumpy, warty or rough, a unique characteristic of this species.

Shown here is a twelve inch, near coning sized plant in a 15g container.  This is a coastal full sun plant and has a cold tolerance into the low 20's F.  We have very limited numbers available on this species.
Encephalartos concinnus Encephalartos concinnus
Encephalartos concinnus Encephalartos concinnus Encephalartos concinnus
Encephalartos concinnus Encephalartos concinnus Encephalartos concinnus

 

CERATOZAMIA ROBUSTA
TWO MATURE SPECIMENS WITH SUBTLE DIFFERENCES IN THE LEAVES

I have always been fond of this large yet tropical appearing green cycad from Mexico and parts of Central America.  I feel this way because it is a big and showy plant.  Native to rainforest cliffs in southern Mexico, Belize and possibly Guatemala, it holds up to twenty leaves and needs room to not only grow but also be observed in the garden.  Plants in habitat have been reported to have stems up to five feet tall.  Leaves tend to be upright and up to twelve feet long.  Petioles are typically armed with spines, sometimes abundantly so.  Leaflets are thin and long, up to sixteen inches, sometimes falcate (sickle shaped) and paired.  Leaflets are green on the dorsal side, a lighter green underneath and strongly revolute (margins rolled under).  There are known to be variations in the appearance of this species as you will note with these three plants.

I am showing you in detail today two fairly large, coning sized specimens.  The first one in the orange box has a cuadex height of about 20 inches.  Note how its leaflets are wider and shorter than the second plant shown n the green box.  The leaflets of the second plant are also somewhat sickle shape.  But, these are both considered Ceratozamia robusta, showing their differences.  The difference in the color of the two female cones may be secondary to age of the cones.  The last photo shows a third plant from my home many years ago and is of similar size.  All are very showy with upright leaves.

This species likes filtered light and is cold hardy to about 25 degrees.  In 2007 no plants were damaged at 25 degrees.  So, I suspect it is a low 20's F. species.  It is a good grower and can even tolerate full sun right along the coast.  But, in this much light, the leaves are more of a lime colored green.  These three mature specimens shown are all at least 30 years old. 
  
Ceratozamia robusta Ceratozamia robusta
Ceratozamia robusta Ceratozamia robusta Ceratozamia robusta
Ceratozamia robusta Ceratozamia robusta  Ceratozamia robusta 
Ceratozamia robusta  Ceratozamia robusta  Ceratozamia robusta 

 

HYOPHORBE VERSCHAFELTII
THE SPINDLE PALM
SHORT PALM WITH SWOLLEN TRUNK

The genus of Hyophorbe comes from the Mascarene Islands.  From a collector's point of view, there are only three species available.  None are tall.  All are exotic and bizarre appearing.
1.  H. lagenicaulis, the Bottle Palm.  Swollen at the base of the trunk.  NOT cold hardy.
2.  H. verschafeltii, middle of trunk swollen, somewhat cold hardy
3.  H. indica, most cold hardy of the group, taller than the previous two palms, irregular trunk but not bulged.

Hyophorbe verschafeltii has more of a yellow color to the petioles and leaf veins.  You can see this in the photos here.  The Bottle Palm demonstrates more red colors.  Cold hardiness is down to about a freeze.  Some plants have taken colder than this in Southern California.  In So Cal, usually the Bottle Palms die with our winter weather.  For this reason, the Spindle Palm is a better choice. 

Hyophorbe verschafeltii loves heat and sun.  It will get up to a height of about fifteen feet in 30 years.  It can show winter stress on the leaves.  Shown here are a 5g and 15g plant.  Note on the mature plant how the bulge is in the middle of the trunk, thus giving it the name of "Spindle" Palm.  If your garden doesn't freeze and you have a warm, sunny spot, this palm is for you.
Hyophorbe verschafeltii Hyophorbe verschafeltii
Hyophorbe verschafeltii Hyophorbe verschafeltii Hyophorbe verschafeltii
Hyophorbe verschafeltii Hyophorbe verschafeltii Hyophorbe verschafeltii

 

JUBAEA CHILENSIS
MATURE SPECIMEN AVAILABLE

Only rarely would I ever talk about a mature, in the ground palm specimen.  But, this one is sort of special and rarely seen available.  I have an acquaintance who wishes to sell this specimen Jubaea chilensis.  It has about twenty-five feet of trunk and is a gorgeous plant as you can see. For those of you who are not familiar with this species, it is the thickest trunked palm species on the planet.  To get a tree of this size takes about four decades of growth.  As a palm nurseryman, I see or hear about a tree like this ever few years.  And, unless you happen to be a crane operator, you'd need a contractor to assist you in digging, transporting and planting this specimen tree.  Please contact me if you or someone you know might be interested.  Although it's not inexpensive, I think you could purchase it for about half the going retail market price.
Jubaea chilensis mature Jubaea chilensis mature








Jubaea chilensis mature Jubaea chilensis mature Jubaea chilensis mature
Jubaea chilensis mature Jubaea chilensis mature  

 

HOWEA FORSTERIANA
KENTIA PALMS, LARGE SPECIMENS

Our nursery normally carries and sells plant material that people can lift.  This is usually plants up to 24 inch, sometimes 30 inch boxes.  Our largest plants may need lift gates to get plants onto a truck, but people can manage and plant them.  With this said, I want to remind readers that I work closely with several associates who specialize in large, crane sized plants. This includes dozens of palm species.  If you are looking for larger material, let me know.  With 37 years under my belt, I know a lot of sources and can probably find anything you want.  Shown here are some large Kentia Palms.  Howea forsteriana will get, over two to three decades, about thirty feet of trunk.  An associate of mine has some for sale with over twenty feet of trunk as shown.  And, he can deliver and plant them in many instances.   This includes both field grown and container grown plants.  The last four photos show Kentias from our nursery.  With strong helpers, these can easily be planted into the garden.  
Howea forsteriana large specimen Howea forsteriana large specimen
Howea forsteriana large specimen Howea forsteriana large specimen Howea forsteriana large specimen
Howea forsteriana large specimen Howea forsteriana large specimen Howea forsteriana large specimen

 

LIVISTONA CHINENSIS
CHINESE FAN PALM

This single trunk fan palm is native to Southern Japan and Taiwan.  It is typically seen as a palm under twenty feet, but after many decades can get up to 30 or 40 feet tall with a trunk that is 12 to 18 inches thick.  It's crown is green and full with leaves that are about six feet across.  In shade the petioles stretch out and the leaves are larger and flatter.  In shade condition, it is fairly exotic appearing.  It is a very slow grower and it is not unusual for this species to take ten years to form any sort of trunk. This species is cold hardy into the upper teens F.  We have for sale typically 5g, 15g and boxed sized plants.  Some of our boxes are quite large, as shown.  In most area, this species tolerates full sun.  But, as mentioned, it can grow in strong filtered light.  It is also known to be used a an interior palm.  BTW, it is the most cold hardy of any species within the genus of Livistona.  It can take temperature into the upper teens F. easily.  
Livistona chinensis 15g Livistona chinensis 15g
Livistona chinensis Livistona chinensis Livistona chinensis 
Livistona chinensis Livistona chinensis Livistona chinensis 
 


SATURDAY, JUNE 15, 2013

 

PRITCHARDIA GLABRATA
RARE HAWAIIAN SPECIES WITH FLAT LEAVES
TEN DAY SPECIAL 15G SIZE

We still have available a small number of this highly sought after Pritchardia that has shiny green petioles, very little crown tomentom and green flat leaves that flex downwards at the end of the leaf segments.  These are good sized and rather old 15g plants.  This species is seldom available.  Cold tolerance mid-twenties F.  Coastal sun and filtered light inland.

REGULAR P[RICE 15G SIZE $185
TEN DAY SPECIAL $150


You must mention this Blog Only special when purchasing.
Pritchardia glabrata Pritchardia glabrata

 

ARCHONTOPHOENIX "SPECIES TERACARPA"
BEST KING PALM AROUND
TEN DAY SPECIAL 2G SIZE

If you've followed this Blog over the years, you might recall what I consider the very best type of King Palm for Southern California.  No one knows for sure exactly what this palm is, but A. maxima is the closest guess.  But, there are differences between plants that are from this mother tree (shown to right) and plants from A. maxima from Australia.  This palm has a huge thick trunk, is faster growing, gets taller and doesn't brown tip in coastal sun!  It is a great palm!  We are offering our 2g size on special.  If you like King Palms, you have to get one of these while we still have them.  The plant to the right in the 2g pot is a double, two plants in the same pot.  We have singles and some multiples.  Everyone growing this raves about it.

REGULAR PRICE 2G SIZE $45
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE $35


You must mention this special when ordering.
Archontophoenix teracarpa Archontophoenix teracarpa

 

ENCEPHALARTOS FEROX
SOUTH AFRICAN CYCAD WITH RED CONE
TEN DAY SPECIAL BARE ROOT SEEDLINGS


Most people grow this species in part day sun or filtered light both along the coast and in inland areas.  It's cold tolerance is the low 20's F.  It is best known for the red cones it produces, especially on female plants.  Its leaflets resemble the Holly Fern.  It is a non-trunking species and gets a six to eight foot crown width.  We are offering bare root seedlings at a super price.

REGULAR PRICE SEEDLINGS $35
TEN DAY SPECIAL: $20 EACH OR THREE FOR $50


You must mention this special to get this price.  These are easy to mail order anywhere within the U.S.  No international shipments.
Encephalartos ferox bare root Encephalartos ferox

 

PHOENIX THEOPHRASTII
THE MOST COLD HARDY OF ANY DATE PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL 5G PLANTS


This medium sized, typically single trunk palm is native to Crete and Turkey.  It is known as the most cold hardy of any Phoenix, even more so than the Canary Island Palm.  I've received reports of it surviving temperatures of approximately 16 to 17 degrees.  It gets to a height of about 20 feet and can sucker.  It has bristly leaves with spines on the stems.  It is not easy to find available.

REGULAR PRICE 5G SIZE $65
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE $50


You must mention this Blog Only special when purchasing.
Phoenix theophrastii Phoenix theophrastii by TS at RPS
photo by TS at RPS

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 2013

 

CYCADS CAN HAVE CORALLOID ROOTS
WHAT DO THEY LOOK LIKE?
HOW ARE THEY IMPORTANT?

Anyone who has grown cycads is probably familiar with the appearance of cycad roots.  Newly germinated seedlings have an oversized taproot that is often larger than the newly formed caudex.  Often these roots can reach into the ground and then contract, actually pulling the caudex further into the ground.  Sometimes cycad caudexes are totally subterranean or under the ground.  The main taproot can also be a means of storage of water and food for the plant.  For species that make large, above the ground trunks, secondary and tertiary roots branch out from the primary tap root and assist in stabilization of the plant and in the collection of water and nutrition. 

But, there is another type of root that cycads have and is truly unique.  These are the "coralloid" roots.  These roots have a different appearance and look very similar to a type of ocean coral.  They form on the ends of secondary or tertiary roots and work there way to the surface of the soil.  They can be seen as clumps or nodules attached to the root on the surface of the soil.  I am showing here a nursery specimen of Dioon rzedowskii and Encephalartos lebomboensis.  Both of these two plants have coralloid roots which we have photographed for you.  An inexperienced cycad grower might think these coralloid roots are some type of invasive root or infection.  But, it is a normal thing that cycads do.

The important thing about these roots is that they can fix nitrogen (i.e. provide nutrition to the plant) from the air.  They contain cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that have this unique ability to pull atmospheric nitrogen and turn it into carbon for the plant.  To do this photosynthesis they need two things: air (contains nitrogen) and light.  Therefore, you see them on the surface where light is available.  This formation of nutrition for the plant, however, is not the primary means of plant support but can provide nutrition and perhaps be important in other unknown ways.  If a cycad were to be in soil that had no nutrition whatsoever, these roots could keep the plant alive until nutrition arrived to the soil.  And, lucky for us humans, cycanobacteria also produce oxygen. 

You'll not see coralloid roots on every cycad.  My observation is that plants that appear "stressed" are more likely to have them.  But, very healthy plants have them as well.  These photos show their peculiar appearance and now you know why they are important.
Dioon rzedowskii
Dioon rzedowskii






Dioon rzedowskii
Dioon rzedowskii
Dioon rzedowskii Dioon rzedowskii Dioon rzedowskii
Encephalartos lebomboensis
Encephalartos lebomboensis
Encephalartos lebomboensis Encephalartos lebomboensis
Encephalartos lebomboensis Encephalartos lebomboensis Encephalartos lebomboensis

 

DIOON SPINULOSUM
NEWLY EMERGING RED LEAVES
RARE TO SEE THIS!

Dioon spinulosum would not be considered a very rare cycad.  It is native to Mexico and can, over many decades, form a rather tall trunk.  It gets it's name from the fact that the leaflets are spiny.  I am showing these phtos today because yesterday we noticed a plant in a 7 gallon container that was doing something we are not used to seeing.

As you can see, the newly emerging leaves are a bronze-red color.  This is very unusual.  We've grown literally many hundreds of these and have yet to see this on our plants of this species.  Internet searches only revealed one other photo of such newly emerging leaves.  Normally they come up a green or silver-green color as shown in the last picture..  Undoubtedly, like other cycads with red emergent leaves, this color will fade to green over a few weeks after emergence.  Red emergent leaves are seen with many cycad species, especially Ceratozamia and Zamia.  But, on Dioon spinulosum, I'd figure it's pretty rare to see.  Could it be a transient thing we won't see again on this plant?  Perhaps.  Could it be the result of a cultural issue?  Perhaps.  But, I sort of doubt the latter and am suspicious this particular plant will do this again.
Dioon spinulosum red emergent Dioon spinulosum red emergent
Dioon spinulosum red emergent Dioon spinulosum red emergent Dioon spinulosum red emergent
Dioon spinulosum red emergent Dioon spinulosum from lifeamongtheleaves blogspot
photo by Amongtheleaves Blog site
 

 

RAVENEA HILDEBRANDTII
SEEDLINGS NOW AVAILABLE

This rare and critically endangered Ravenea species is actually from the Comoro Islands and not from Madagascar.  It is an understory species that lives in low elevation habitats.  Although specimens in the wild have trunks up to over twenty feet, domestically, the largest plants I've seen are under ten feet.  Trunk diameter is usually two to three inches.  It is a very slow growing plant.  It has a cold tolerance into the twenties and does not want full sun unless you lie in a very mild climate. 

Recently, this has been a difficult species to find.  We are presently offering some 12 to 18 month old seedlings in the band size as shown.
Ravenea hildebrandtii Ravenea hildebrandtii
Ravenea hildebrandtii Ravenea hildebrandtii Ravenea hildebrandtii

 

DIOON SPINULOSUM
TEN DAY SPECIAL ONE GALLON PLANTS

Above I briefly discussed this species.  It is an understory cycad for most areas and has a narrow trunk with a full crown of leaves.  It is native to Mexico.  Cold tolerance is into the mid-twenties F.  On special we have five year old, rather large one gallon plants.  These plants are easy to mail order right to your door.  Leaf lengths are about two feet on average and caudex size is easily two inches.

REGULAR PRICE ONE GALLON $45
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE $30


You must mention this Blog Only Special when purchasing.
Dioon spinulosum
one gallon size
Dioon spinulosumi

 

CHAMAEDOREA METALLICA
DWARF SHADE PALM WITH METALLIC SHEEN

This cute and attractive miniature palm is native to southern Mexico where it is near extinction because of over collecting.  It is single trunk, has a crown shaft, has complete or simple leaves and usually only gets to a height of three to four feet.  I have seen taller specimens, but this is rare.  It gets its name from the fact that there is a metallic or silver-like sheen to the leaves.  It is a shiny leaf as compared to species that have silver but are dull in appearance.  The leaves are less than a foot long and have short petioles.  Leaves are smaller than Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti and larger than C. tenella.  Leaves such as those seen with this species are sometimes described as 'simple", "solid", "complete", or "bifid with apical points".  The leaf texture and surface are somewhat wavy, giving it lighter and darker areas.  This adds to the attractiveness of the species.

There is a pinnate form of this species that you'll see from time to time.  One will see these in habitat.  My suspicion is that there are genes in this species acquired long ago that were from hybrids with another pinnate species and occasionally appear presently as a leaf with multiple leaflets.  Chamaedorea metallica is cold hardy into the mid-twenties F. and is a shade palm.  A little bit of sun is tolerated, but too much will burn the leaves and make them unsightly.  Shown here are some new 1.5 gallon plants we just got in.  Many like to plant this species in small colonies with several plants together.  This is advantageous as plants age so you don't end up with a taller trunk with this small head of leaves.  C. metallica is also a perfect house plant for someone who wants a counter top plant that doesn't get too big.  
Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea metallica
Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea metallica
Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea metallica
Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea metallica Chamaedorea metallica

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013

 

SABAL PALMETTO
THE PALMETTO PALM

This medium to large fan palm is native to the United States and an assortment of Caribbean islands including Cuba.  It's native habitat extends as far north as North Carolina.  It is amazingly salt tolerant.  In Florida you can see it right up into the coastal dunes.  I've seen plants just a few feet from the bay at Tampa Bay and thriving.  It is green in color and has a trunk that is of variable heights, ranging from ten feet to up to eighty feet.  I once had an order for "tall" Palmettos and thought they only get up to a height of about twenty feet.  On inquiring from a broker in Florida, I quickly came to find that specimens are available (dug from locality) with heights of well over fifty feet.  You'd think that perhaps this species could be threatened by digging.  I'd invite you to just pick a locality in Florida and drive around.   There are so many Palmettos near the water that you couldn't begin to count them all.

This is a durable, hardy palm with obvious salt tolerance.  I've also seen palms growing in the sand around ocean beach goers.  It's cold hardiness is into the mid teens F. and it prefers full sun for optimal growth.  However, it does tolerate partial shade.  Also, it can tolerate desert conditions if given adequate water.  Trunks have a "criss-cross" pattern of attached leaf bases.  Later the palm sheds these to show a fairly smooth appearing trunk.  With my comments above, you'd think there are lots of these available in CA.  This is not the case; they are hard to find.  Shown are some 5g plants, domestic and native mature plants and an interesting divided head specimen.

Finally, for those of you displaced from South Carolina, you can bring a little of your state to your present location by growing this palm.  Sabal palmetto is your state tree.  We can ship one right to your displaced location. 
Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto
Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto
Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto
Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto
Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto
Sabal palmetto Sabal palmetto double head by JS
photo by JS
Sabal palmetto Jacksonville Zoo Website
photo from Jacksonville Zoo Website

 

ENCEPHALARTOS BUBALINUS
RARE CYCAD FROM NORTHERN TANZANIA

Many of you have perhaps never heard of this medium sized green cycad that grows at an elevation of 4000 feet in the rocky hills of Tanzania in Eastern Africa, bordered by Kenya to the north and Mozambique to the south. It is a green cycad with leaves about four to five feet long.  It's trunk gets to six feet tall with a width of approximately 18 inches.  On cultivated plants, I've noted that sometimes the color is a gray-green.  Leaflets of juvenile plants are cupped.  Mature leaflets are narrow as shown. This species can be grown in sun along the coast.  It needs good soil drainage.  Cold tolerance is probably in the mid twenties, perhaps down to about 22 degrees.  Shown here is an assortment of nursery plants and a mature specimen. . 
Encephalartos bubalinus Encephalartos bubalinus
Encephalartos bubalinus Encephalartos bubalinus Encephalartos bubalinus
Encephalartos bubalinus Encephalartos bubalinus
 

 

ROYSTONEA BORINQUENA
A MORE COLD HARDY ROYAL PALM?

It seems that almost everyone loves the Royal Palm.  This is a group of New World pinnate palms with tall trunks, swollen bases, and long green crown shafts.  The problem is that some people are in areas that get too cold.  After our Southern California freeze in 2007, I received many reports that Roystonea borinquena did better with the cold than other species of Royal Palms.  I certainly don't want to suggest that this species is good for people who routinely see temperatures into the low 20's.  But, if you live in an area where once in a while you get into the mid-twenties, this might be a better species to try.  It might give you a degree or two more cold hardiness.. 

It is native to Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and a few surrounding Caribbean Islands.  Overall height is up to fifty feet, trunk diameter is 18 inches with a long prominent emerald green crown shaft, leaf length up to fifteen feet.  The base is not as swollen as the Cuban Royal, R. regia.  Growth rate is moderate.  It likes full sun.  It withstood the 2007 freeze where it saw temperatures of 24 degrees.  I think the reader should assume that any mid-twenties temperatures will most likely damage a Royal Palm.  In time, we'll know for sure if this species is better with cold.  We try to have this species available in various sizes.  Shown is a 15g plant.  Note that on none of the photos here of large plants is the trunk base massively swollen.
Roystonea borinquena Roystonea borinquena
Roystonea borinquena Roystonea borinquena Roystonea borinquena
Roystonea borinquena Roystonea borinquena Roystonea borinquena

 

TRITHRINAX CAMPESTRIS
BLUE, SUCKERING FAN PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL TWO SIZES!
 

I talked about this species recently, but wanted to mention it again because it is so rare to see plants like this available.  We have super blue 5g and 15g plants presently.  These take hot, blazing sun, will live in the desert, are cold hardy into the mid-teens F., and can be grown in humid areas like TX or FL.  Shown here are both of the sizes we have available. These are well established, older plants.  For those who have grown this species, you know how slow they are.  The 15g shown here are at least eight years old.  We're running out of these, so if you like this species, act now.  They'll be gone soon.

REGULAR PRICES: 5G $75, 15G $185
TEN DAY SPECIAL:  5G $55, 15G $150


You must mention this Blog only special to get these prices.


 
Trithrinax campestris Trithrinax campestris
Trithrinax campestris Trithrinax campestris Trithrinax campestris

 

DYPSIS LEPTOCHEILOS
THE TEDDY BEAR PALM
RUST COLORED FUZZY CROWN SHAFT

I feel this species should be in the Top Ten List of desirable palms for Southern California.  It is a good grower, is not overly large, has an attractive silver-blue trunk that is topped off with a rusty brown crown shaft that feels like velvet.  What else could you want? 

This species comes from Madagascar, gets to about 25 feet height and has a rather thin trunk of six inches typically.  If the trunk doesn't get any direct sun, it will maintain this color throughout its life.  With sun, it will develop a brown tan color.  So, you might consider planting the species where it will pierce the canopy but maintain shade on its trunk.  Along the coast Dypsis leptocheilos can be grown in full sun, all day long.  If you live far inland, I'd give it part day sun.  Cold tolerance is into the low 20's F.  At our nursery in 2007, 25 degrees did not burn this species. 

Shown here is an assortment of sizes from 1g plants up to 25g.  Sizes available changes over time, but we try to always have this species in stock.  No palm garden is complete without a Teddy Bear.   
 Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis leptocheilos
Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis leptocheilos
Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis leptocheilos Dypsis leptocheilos

 

ROYSTONEA REGIA
LARGER OUTDOOR GROWN PLANTS

I've heard from customers that it's fairly difficult right now to find Royal Palms outdoor grown of any size.  Below is an assortment of 15g through 25g and on up to 30 inch boxed sized specimen, all of which have been grown outdoors.  They are used to sun and ready to be put into the ground.  We of course have our greenhouse grown stock that will eventually go outdoors, but these plants have been outdoors for years.  25g and larger are showing two feet of brown trunk or more (four feet or more by the traditional ground to emerging leaf definition).  But, there are limited numbers.  So, if you want a Royal Palm for the garden, don't wait too long or these might be gone.  Last photos are specimen plants.   This is a sun species with cold tolerance down to about 25 degrees, like the King Palm. 
Roystonea regia Roystonea regia
Roystonea regia Roystonea regia Roystonea regia
roystonea regia roystonea regia Roystonea regia box 
Roystonea regia  Roystonea regia
Southern CA R. regia 
Roystonea regia
So Cal, R. regia on left 

 

BEAUCARNIA RECURVATA
THE PONY TAIL PALM OR ELEPHANT FOOT PALM
NICE 5G PLANTS NOW AVAILABLE

This is another example of a succulent plant that is called a "palm" but is not a palm at all.  It comes from Mexico and, in many decades, can get up to about 30 feet or more with a twelve foot wide base.  It can put up many trunks from the main basilar, swollen trunk, given it five or more leaf heads.  Or, one can cut any given trunk and it can divide into multiple trunks.  The base of the trunk is what gives it popularity.  It's like a swollen onion, bulbous in shape.  The leaflets are thin and green in color.  They protrude upwards and then curve back down toward the ground.  The surface of the trunk is like elephant skin.  Growth rate is medium.  We now have some 5g plants that are quite nice and can be shipped anywhere within the U.S.  These are shown here along with some older plants.  Cold tolerance is into the teens and it prefers full, not sun.  It can be grown indoors in a bright window area.  The last photo shows a very old specimen at Fairchild Tropical Garden in Florida.  I've seen photos of a specimen in habitat where a Jeep is parked on top of the swollen base. 
beaucarnea recurvata  beaucarnea recurvata 
beaucarnea recurvata beaucarnea recurvata beaucarnea recurvata
beaucarnea recurvata  beaucarnea recurvata  Beaucarnia recurvata Floridata Website 

 

TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 2013

 

SYAGRUS BORTYOPHORA
A GOOD ALTERNATIVE TO THE QUEEN PALM?

About ten to fifteen years ago this new Syagrus species was introduced to the market.  It was felt to be the hands down choice as an alternative to the Queen Palm.  This was said because it is smaller, thinner and can potentially hold more leaves.  The trunk diameter is about one foot (thinner than the Queen) and heights are up to fifty feet.  Leaves are keeled and also shorter than Queen Palms.  Exact cold hardiness is still to be determined, but I don't think it's as cold hardy as the common Queen Palm. I'd estimate low 20's F. at best compared to upper teens by the Queen.  It does tolerate full sun.

Shown here are three plants in a 25g pot.  It looks nice as a multiple.  Also shown is the crown of a 15g plant.  You can see from the mature specimen pictures that the trunk is tall and narrow.  The leaves also arch more than the Queen.  If you live in a super cold area, this species may not be a good one. But, in Southern California, perhaps some will prefer this thinner Syagrus species.
Syaagrus botryophora Syaagrus botryophora
Syaagrus botryophora Syaagrus botryophora Syaagrus botryophora
A 15 gallon nursery plant
Syagrus botryophora Syagrus botryophora Syagrus botryophora
Syagrus botryophora by TS at RPS
by TS at RPS
 by Pablo Herrera PACSOA
 In habitat by Pablo Herrera PACSOA
 

 

ENCEPHALARTOS TRISPINOSUS
NICE 15 GALLON SPECIMEN

This blue species of Encephalartos is native to the Eastern Cape province of the Republic of South Africa.  Note this is the same province as the E. arenarius I showed you two days ago.  This species is intensely blue in color and small in mature size.  Maximum trunk height is three feet with a trunk diameter of about twelve inches, perhaps a bit more.  Leaflets have the classic "three spines" (although there is leaflet variation in this species) making this a spiny cycad.  Growth rate is slow to medium. 

Shown here is a handsome 15g plant with about a nine to ten inch caduex and a full head of leaves.  Cold tolerance is about 22 degrees F. without protection.  It likes full sun along the coast and part day sun inland.   This species does resemble E. horridus to the casual observer.  Note the gold colored collars at the base of the leaf stems.  These collars are also seen with E. horridus, princeps and lehmannii. 
Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus
Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus
E. trispinosus female cone

 

CERATOZAMIA SPECIES WITH LONG LEAFLETS AND NO SPINES

One of the more exciting things about doing this blog is presenting a plant that doesn't seem to match the textbook descriptions of any given species.  Shown here is such a plant.  It is a Ceratozamia for sure.  But, it has very thin and super long leaflets.  And, the petioles are totally un-armed.  This is unusual. It doesn't match the descripitions of the classical Ceratozamia mexicana or robusta.  This is a very old plant, probably about thirty years old.  It is a female as we saw remnants of an old female cone on the soil.  I do not recall if it is red emergent. 

It has been grown in part day sun and is stunningly beautiful.  It's cold hardiness should be about 20 degrees F.  Note how the trunk is dividing with two crowns of leaves.  The leaves are upright and fairly crowded.  There are absolutely no spines on any of the stems.  We only have one such plant and it's a beauty!
Ceratozamia species long leaflets Ceratozamia species long leaflets
Ceratozamia species long leaflets Ceratozamia species long leaflets Ceratozamia species long leaflets

 

CYCAS CURRANII
AN OLD BOXED SPECIMEN

I have previously discussed Cycas species from the Island of Palawan.  Today I thought I'd quickly show a few pictures of one of my favorites, Cycas curranii.  This is a boxed specimen although we also have very nice 15g plants.  This species is a large plant with potential to get heights over thirty feet.  Despite this trunk height, the trunk diameter is thin when mature.  It is usually 12 to 18 inches thick, rarely more.  The leaves tend to be upright with drooping leaflets.   It has minimal armor on the proximal petiole.  This boxed specimen shown has a trunk of about twenty inches and six foot leaves.  The last photo by George Yao shows how gorgeous the leaves are.  It can be grown in coastal sun or strong filtered light.  Cold hardiness is into the mid, perhaps lower 20's F.  This plant has seen 25 degrees with no damage.
Cycas curranii Cycas curranii
Cycas curranii Cycas curranii PACSOA by George Yao
by George Yao
 

 

RAVENEA JULIETIAE
SINGLE TRUNK MADAGASCAR SPECIES
TEN DAY SPECIAL 5 GALLON PLANTS


This endangered species from eastern Madagascar gets up to about 30 feet in height with a six inch trunk.  Leaves are keeled, six to eight feet long and have a prominent arch.  This is a coastal sun species or part day sun inland.  It is very slow growing. The 5g plants that we have on sale are about five years old at least.  Cold tolerance is into the mid and perhaps to low 20's F.

REGULAR PRICE 5G $75
TEN DAY SPECIAL $55


You must mention this Blog only special to get this price.
Ravenea julliete Ravenea julietiae by Rolf Kyburz
photo by Rolf Kyburz

 

BISMARCKIA NOBILIS
BLUE MADAGASCAR FAN PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL 15G SIZE


This popular blue fan palm comes from sunny and hot areas in Madagascar and has been found to be a superior palm for many areas of the U.S.  It thrives in Southern California and also in more humid states like Florida and Hawaii.  Mature heights can reach over forty feet although it's uncertain how tall it'll get here in California.  Cold tolerance is about 22 degrees F.  It loves full hot sun. 

REGULAR PRICE 15G $175
TEN DAY SPECIAL $95


You must mention this Blog only special to get this price.
Bismarckia nobilis Bismarckia
Located at Balboa Park, San Diego

 

DYPSIS PSAMMOPHILA
JUVENILE RED STEMS, LATER BLACK TRUNKS WITH WHITE CROWN SHAFTS

This is a small to medium sized, suckering palm from Eastern Madagascar.  It gets to a height of about 12 to 15 feet and the leaves are keeled.  When young, juvenile leaf stems and the base of the trunk have a prominent red color.  Later the trunks turn black or near black in color.  At the top of these dark stems are powder white crown shafts.  Shown here is a 5g plant demonstrating this prominent red color.  Other photos show the white crown shafts and dark trunks.  This is a filtered light species with cold tolerance into the upper twenties F. range.
Dypsis psammonphila Dypsis psammonphila
Dypsis psammonphila Dypsis psammonphila Dypsis psammophila by Arrowsmith at Palmpedia
by Phil Arrowsmith, PalmPedia
Dypsis psammophila Dypsis psammophila  

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013

 

ENCEPHALARTOS ARENARIUS
A BEAUTIFUL BLUE GREEN NURSERY SPECIMEN

This attractive cycad is native to the Cape Province in the Republic of South Africa.  It is a relatively small species with trunk height to a maximum of about three feet.  It holds a nice crown of up to two dozen leaves that are three to four feet long and typically arch down toward the ground.  I have selected a very nice boxed specimen at the nursery to demonstrate the powdery blue-green color of a set of new leaves.  These leaves shown here are about six to eight weeks old.  As they mature, there might be some decrease in the blue color but even over time they will not turn to a plain green color. 

The color of Encephalartos arenarius varies from pure blue to a plain green.  The color of any given plant's leaves tends to be consistent over the life of the plant.  In other words, there are plants that have green leaves, others with blue-green leaves and even one variety with super blue colored leaves.  The latter is known as the "true" blue arenarius.  It is characterized by a different appearing cone.  You would anticipate that the plant here in the orange box will always be a blue-green color.  Close up photos here demonstrate the prominent marginal lobes on the leaflets making it a spiny species.   

I have also shown a few other nursery plants that demonstrate this blue-green color.  The last photo below is of the "true blue" arenarius.  We have an excellent supply of arenarius for sale in many sizes. 

Encephalartos arenarius Encephalartos arenarius
Encephalartos arenarius Encephalartos arenarius Encephalartos arenarius
Encephalartos arenarius Encephalartos arenarius Encephalartos arenarius
Encephalartos arenarius Encephalartos arenarius Encephalartos arenarius
A true E. arenarius "blue" variety

 

BRAHEA DULCIS
MEDIUM SIZED FAN PALM FROM MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA
LEAF COLOR GREEN TO BLUE GREEN

When one thinks about the genus of Brahea, one assumes that it's a fan palm from Mexico.  However, the native distribution of this species extends from eastern and western Mexico south through Latin America all the way to El Salvador.  It is a mountainous species that lives at elevations up to one mile.  It is said that the fruit is 'sweet", thus the Latin name.  It is also known as the Rock Palm.  Trunk size is up to twenty feet with a ten inch diameter. It is a single trunk species but on occasion can sucker.  It can be grown in coastal sun and tolerates filtered light inland.

The interesting thing is the color of the leaves.  Some specimens have green leaves and others are blue green.  But, in my experience, when younger and a nursery plant all leaves are green.  This is similar to what we see with Brahea decumbens.  Plants have to mature in sun in the garden to pick up the blue color.  But, as you can see, the photos here show that mature Brahea dulcis do carry a blue green crown.

Cold tolerance is into the lower 20's F.  Shown here is a 15g and a 5g nursery plant.  Note the hairs on the petioles and even on the leaves to a minimal extent.  I've not seen these hairs described in texts.  The petiole is a bit spiny but not prominently so as shown here.  Also note that the leaves are flat and rounded shape.  This is a slow to medium growth rate palm.  . 
Brahea dulcis Brahea dulcis
Brahea dulcis Brahea dulcis Brahea dulcis
Brahea dulcis Brahea dulcis Brahea dulcis
Brahea dulcis Brahea dulcis by TS at RPS
photo by TS at RPS
Brahea dulcis by Angelos Porcelli PACSOA
Brahea dulcis by Angelos Porcelli PACSOA

 

THREE "CUTTING EDGE" NEW PALM SPECIES AVAILABLE IN OUR BAND SIZE!

 

LICUALA RADULA
AKA LICUALA DASYANTHA
EXOTIC MOTTLED FAN PALM WITH SOME COLD HARDINESS

About twenty years ago when word first came out that there was a mottled leaf, understory Licuala that had some degree of cold hardiness, there was quite the buzz.  We all knew of a similar miniature species, Licuala mapu, but this latter species basically had no chance of survival outdoors in Southern California.  At that time, the only chance of getting a Licuala radula was to obtain an actual little seedling that somehow made its way out of North Viet Nam and found its way to your locality.  You could probably count on your fingers the number of plants that were available in the US at that time.  Fortunately, the natural habitat of this species spreads up into China.  From that area and in recent years, a limited amount of seeds have been produced / obtained and to a very limited extent this species is now available.  In the wild, there has been tremendous pressure on this species from a conservation point of view because it is so beautiful.

It is an understory palm that gets to a height of about three feet with multiple stems.  Leaves are about eighteen inches wide.  It's individual segments create a circular appearing leaf.  But, the most striking characteristic are the mottled leaves with tones of dark green, lime green and sometimes yellow.  Individual segments are under two inches wide and these segments are the widest at their ends.  Note that, unlike other Licuala, this species is dioecious and you must have both sexes to set viable seed.  Shown here are two year old seedlings.  Very limited numbers are available.  It is a filtered light plant and cold hardiness is probably into the mid-thirties, perhaps a bit colder.  

One last comment: the name has recently been changed from "radula" to "dasyantha", although I prefer the old name.  Our availability of these gorgeous plants will probably be quite short-lived.  . .    
Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha)
Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha)
Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha) Licuala radula (dasyantha)
photo by T.S. at RPS

 

BASSELINIA VELUTINA
AMAZINGLY RARE NEW CALEDONIAN PALM!

This unbelievably rare palm species is native to New Caledonia where it natively grows at an elevation of up to over 5000 feet.  The name "velutina" refers to the velvet tomentum on the crown shaft.  It is a medium to large species with a single trunk that can reach heights of thirty feet.  The crown shaft bulges larger than the trunk and is covered with gray hairs.  The leaves are eight feet long, arching and keeled in cross section.  Because of rarity, little is known about its culture, although it is said to be able to withstand a freeze.  We have only several small band sized plants.  
Basselinia velutina Basselinia velutina
Basselinia velutina Basselinia velutina Basselinia velutina by Daniel & Irène Létocart (le 01/01/1970
photo from Endemia.NC by Daniel & Irène Létocart

 

ACTINOKENTIA DIVARICATA WATERMELON

We have previously talked about this thin trunked, slow growing species from New Caledonia and how it has cold hardiness well into the mid- to lower-twenties F.  In habitat, there is reportedly one small cluster of plants that have a "watermelon" crown shaft and lower crown.  You may  be familiar with the "watermelon" form of Chambeyronia.  Seeds recently became available and now you can purchase one of this variety of Actinokentia divaricata, watermelon form.  It is a filtered light plant and gets perhaps to a height of fifteen or twenty feet in a few decades.  It is being grown in colder areas such as the San Francisco Bay area and some gulf areas.  I wish to thank Tobias Spanner for his pictures showing the crown shaft "watermelon" appearance. 
Actinokentia divaricata watermelon Actinokentia divaricata watermelon
Actinokentia divariata
non-watermelon form
Actinokentia divaracata watermelon by TS at RPS
watermelon form by TS at RPS
Actinokentia divaracata watermelon by TS at RPS
watermelon form by TS at RPS

 

THE GENUS OF RAPHIA
PECULIAR PALMS WITH HUGE LEAVES

This is a very interesting yet bewildering genus of large plants with distribution from Africa, Madagascar and with one species in the Americas.  They are massive plants with one species having the longest leaves of any palm in the world.  Raphia regalis from Africa reportedly has leaves up to eighty feet long!  Most live in habitats of lower elevation, often swampy or wet.  With this said, surprisingly a few species seem to grow in Southern California.  Some species are single trunk, others suckering.  All have long upright leaves.  Leaflet edges are spiny, see photo.  I am going to make specific comments on three species here.  Heights below will probably not be reached in the average domestic garden in more temperate areas.

1.  Raphia farinifera:  Usually single trunk, sometimes suckers, from Central Africa, likes lots of water, takes sun in coastal areas, gets leaves to seventy feet with a long petiole.  Can take temperatures down to about a freeze.
2.  Raphia australis: Not from Australia, rather from Central Africa.  Lowland species.  Surprisingly, perhaps easier to grow than farinifera.  Sixty foot leaves, sometimes suckers, has interesting orange color to rachis and petiole. (see photos).  Similar growing traits.
3.  Raphia hookeri:  One of my favorites, I've never had for sale, from central western Africa, shorter leaves, usually single trunk.  Most interesting is the trunk which has Tillandsia or Spanish Moss type of fibers on its trunk.  Close up photos show this.  Once I got a hundred of the huge seeds of this species but couldn't get even one to germinate.  No growing data available.  Never been for sale.

Availability of Raphia is essentially zero.  We, on occasion, do have a few for sale. Shown are our 15g plants.
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia farinifera
Raphia australis
Raphia australis
Raphia australis
Raphia australis
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri
Raphia hookeri

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013

 

ZAMIA IMPERIALIS
AKA "ZAMIA SKINNERI RED EMERGENT"
LARGEST LEAFLETS OF ANY CYCAD!
SEEDLINGS AVAILABLE

This dramatically beautiful Panamanian cycad is one of the most impressive tropical cycads one will ever see.  It comes from  rich rain forest areas in central Panama up to 2000 feet elevation.  For many decades it's been known as "Red Emergent Zamia skinneri".  About five years ago Taylor/Haynes/Holzman renamed it to Zamia imperialis.  The complex of "skinneri" has been broken down into several different species.  We knew there were green emergent forms and forms with huge leaflets.  This species is the champion with leaflets up to 30 inches that are eight inches wide.  These leaflets are the largest of any cycad species in the world.

And, new leaves emerge red or copper red in color.  Mature plants can have a meter of trunk and typically hold three to ten leaves.  These leaves gently arch.  The leaflet surface is plicated with groves as  shown here.  I am showing some older photos here when this plant was known as "skinneri" along with newer pictures since being re-named.  My thanks to the authors of these pictures. 


This species does not tolerate a freeze and likes filtered light.  We presently have available a small number of seedlings.  These won't last long and can be mail ordered right to your door.  This is one of the most rare Zamia species you could have.
Zamia imperialis Zamia imperialis
Zamia imperialis Zamia imperialis Zamia imperialis
Zamia imperialis Zamia skinneri
Zamia skinneri
Zamia skinneri
Zamia skinneri
Zamia skinneri by RPS
Zamia skinneri by TS at RPS
Zamia skinneri by RM
Zamia skinneri
Zamia imperialis by TS at RPS
Zamia imperialis by TS at RPS
Zamia imperialis by TS at RPS
Zamia imperialis by TS at RPS
Zamia imperialis by TS at RPS
Zamia imperialis by TS at RPS
Zamia imperialis from XericWorld.com website
Zamia imprialis from XericWorld.com Website

 

ZAMIA PSEUDOMONTICOLA
EXOTIC ZAMIA WITH PERHAPS MORE COLD TOLERANCE

This Costa Rican species of tropical Zamia is quite similar to Zamia fairchildeana.  However, it comes from a higher elevation in mountainous areas and the leaflet margins do not have spines.  Also, the petioles are without spines.  In habitat it grows at elevations of over 3000 feet, so people conjecture that perhaps it will grow more easily in areas like Southern California. Enthusiasts in Florida report it is a better growing species than fairchildeana and in not too many years will form a nice garden specimen.

Trunks get to about a meter tall.  Leaflets are two to three inches wide and about twelve to eighteen inches long.  Mature plants hold four to six leaves. Note that the leaflet surface is smooth and not groved like the imperialis.  Caudex diameter is thin.  Shown here are a few of the limited numbers of seedlings of this species that we have for sale. 
Zamia pseudomonticola Zamia pseudomonticola
Zamia pseudomonticola Zamia pseudomonticola
Photo by Dennis Stevenson at  the Cycad Pages Site

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 2013

 

RAVENEA GLAUCA
A MADAGASCAR PALM, HUGE 5G PLANTS
TEN DAY SPECIAL 5 GALLON SIZE


We have some 5g Ravenea glauca that are huge for their container and an exception deal with our ten day special.  Some of these are chest high and all are chunky with nice trunks.  This Madagascar palm gets to about twenty feet, perhaps somewhat taller and has a thin trunk of six inches.  I would consider it a medium sized palm; the crown is not that large.  It is a very good growing palm and along the coast loves full sun.  Cold hardiness is somewhere in the mid-twenties F., perhaps a bit less.  These are part of the plant collection we recently acquired.  All have seen significant cold in past winters.

REGULAR PRICE 5G SIZE $65
TEN DAY SPECIAL $45

In other words, you're more or less getting a 15g plant for $45.  You must mention this Blog Only special when ordering. 
The last photo here was taken by a friend of mine in habitat and is one of my favorite pictures.



Ravenea glauca 5g Ravenea glauca 5g
Ravenea glauca 5g Ravenea glauca 5g Ravenea glauca 5g
Ravenea glauca 5g Ravenea glauca Arkive Website
photo from Arkive Website, habitat
Ravenea glauca habitat MR
habitat photo by MR

 

CHAMAEDOREA TEPEJILOTE
THE PACAYA PALM
SOME THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW

This single trunk palm is from Mexico and Central America and gets to a height of about fifteen feet.  Cold tolerance is into the mid to low 20/s F  Today I thought I would describe a few things that you may not know and that I've learned about this attractive species.

1.  It has a
dark green trunk with prominent rings.  Diameter is usually about 1.5, sometimes 2 inches.
2.  There are
male and female plants.  Shown here is a male plant.  These flowers produce an amazing amount of pollen.  When ready, a simple flick of the finger releases a cloud of pollen.  If there is a receptive female nearby, you are almost guaranteed of getting seeds. When gold or yellow, the males are ready.   With age, they turn brown as seen n the third photo
3. 
Flower bracts can get quite large, almost ear of corn sized, and are eaten in native localities.
4.  A way to recognize this plant is to look for the
yellow stripe on the underside of the leaf stem, as shown in two photos here.
5.  This is a
shade demanding species.  In my experience, a plant that starts in shade and then grows into the sun will burn and may die.  Give it a damp and shady locality in the garden.
6.  This plant can do well as a
houseplant as long as it has adequate humidity. 
7.  They look
better when planted as multiples in the same pot or garden location. 
8.  Although not a true "stilt root forming" species, Chamaedorea tepejilote gives it a try and
sometimes will show small stilt roots.
8.  There is a
suckering form of this species.  i've shown a close up of a suckering plant so you can see the suckering stem coming off the main trunk.  This are rare and hard to find.
10. 
Seeds on a female tree are initially green as shown below and then turn pure black, at which time they are ready to harvest.
11.  Plants need cleaning of old leaf bases to help prevent insects (especially mealy bug) infestations.  But,
pulling off a leaf base prematurely may lead to permanent scarring of the trunk as seen in the last photo.
Chamaedorea tepejilote Chamaedorea tepejilote
Chamaedorea tepejilote
older spent male blossom to right
Chamaedorea tepejilote
male flower about to produce pollen
Chamaedorea tepejilote
multiple immature flower spikes coming
Chamaedorea tepejilote
yellow stripe on the underside of the stem
Chamaedorea tepejilote
although not true still roots, plants try to form them
Chamaedorea tepejilote
Chamaedorea tepejilote Chamaedorea tepejilote Chamaedorea tepejilote
two plants in one pot is more attractive
Chamaedorea tepejilote
Another look at the yellow stripe on stem
Chamaedorea tepejilote suckering
suckering form with additional stem forming
Chamaedorea tepejilote
immature green seeds.  These will turn black.
Chamaedorea tepejilote Chamaedorea tepejilote by TS RPS
small colony, photo by TS at RPS
Chamaedorea tepejilote Ian Edwards PACSOA
base of colony, photo by Ian Edwards PACSOA
Chamaedorea tepejilote Chamaedorea tepejilote
leaflets are wide and long
Chamaedorea tepejilote
prominent rings on the stem.  Note stem scar.

 

BUTIA BONNETTII
MOST COLD HARDY BUTIA THERE IS?
A SMALLER BUTIA PLANT


This is a difficult palm to discuss because there is disagreement over what it is and if it's actually a species or just a variety of Butia capitata.  People seek it out because the urban legend is that it is easily the most cold hardy of all the Butia species.  The latter may be true, but it remains "what is this palm?".

Most would agree that it is probably a variety of capitata.  It doesn't get as tall as capitat, about half the height and peaks out at about ten feet.  The crown width is six to eight feet..  So, it might be perfect for someone who wants a smaller palm.  It has gray-green foliage and gives edible fruit.  It is a full sun plant with cold tolerance probably about 10 degrees.

Shown here are some 15g plants that we have for sale at the nursery.  These can be shipped.
Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii
Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii
Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii Butia bonnettii
Butia bonnettii Palmpedia
photo care of Palmpedia
Butia bonnettii by Dennis Valdez
photo by Dennis Valdez
Butia bonnettii drawing, unknown artis
drawing by unknown artist

 

DYPSIS PLUMOSA
THIN TRUNK, SILVER COLOR, MEDIUM SIZE
TEN DAY SPECIAL BAND SIZE


This species of single trunk, crown shafted palm comes from Madagascar.  My son, Jesse, says it's a great species and very under-appreciated.  In his garden in San Diego its done extremely well in full sun and is a good growing species.  It gets to about 20 feet of height, has a six inch trunk and interesting silver coloring to the crown shaft.  It has thin leaflets and the leaves are green.  Shown here is a large band size of this species.  Cold tolerance is estimated to be mid-twenties F.

REGULAR PRICE BAND SIZE $35
TEN DAY SPECIAL $25


Mention this Blog-only special when ordering.

Dypsis plumosa

 

RHAPIDOPHYLLUM HYSTRIX
THE WORLD'S MOST COLD HARDY PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL 15G SIZE


There is no doubt in my mind that this species is the most cold tolerant of any palm species.  It is native to the southeastern United States with native habitats stretching from South Carolina down to northern Florida and into Alabama and Mississippi.  There are reports of this species tolerating below zero degrees F.  Now, this doesn't mean that you can grow it in Michigan.  But, in areas that see significant cold such as North Carolina, central Texas or even New Mexico, this species might work for you.

It is a suckering fan palm and
known as the "Needle Palm" because it forms dark colored, protuberant needles on the trunk.  The fourth picture below shows small needles forming on the trunk.  The leaves are green and segmented.  In sun the color is a silver green with more silver underneath.  In shade the color gets dark green, reminiscent of a Rhapis palm.  Trunks are usually under three feet tall and four to six inches thick.  But, because the leaves come upwards, the overall height of the plant can be six to seven feet or taller.  They can get a bit bushy.  My specimen is in filtered light and quite pretty.  It loves my garden and is easy to grow.  But, it is slow growing.

I just got in several pretty nice 15g plants as shown here.  I also might have some 5g plants.  I can ship these 15g plants anywhere within the U.S. but the pots are heavy. 

REGULAR PRICE 15G $175
TEN DAY SPECIAL $150


You must mention this Blog Only Special to get this price.
Rhapidophyllum hystrix Rhapidophyllum hystrix
Rhapidophyllum hystrix Rhapidophyllum hystrix Rhapidophyllum hystrix
Rhapidophyllum hystrix Rhapidophyllum hystrix Rhapidophyllum hystrix
grown in dark shade

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 2013

 

DIOOON EDULE, VARIETY JICALA HIDALGO
SUN-LOVING, COLD TOLERANT SMALLER CYCAD FROM MEXICO

Dioon edule is a smaller species of cycad from Mexico known for it's superior toleration of hot sun and cold weather.  It is one of the few species of cycads that can tolerate direct desert sun.  And, its cold tolerance is into the teens F.  There is a very desirable variety of this species that comes from the state of Hidalgo (central and eastern Mexico) and the town of Jicala.  There is grows at elevations of 1500 to 5000 feet in deciduous forest. Populations can also be found in San Louis Potosi, southern Tamaulipas, and Veracruz states.  As with many species, when you go from one population to the next, there are differences in appearance of this species.  Some have a blue-green color in full sun and others carry a large amount of hair on the leaves.  The leaflet edges of this species are revolute, i.e. they fold back under a bit.  Trunk height is variable, somewhere between three feet and perhaps as tall as nine feet in very old specimens in the wild.  Crowns are compact and rarely over five feet wide.  Leaflet edges do not have spines. 

Shown here is an older 15g plant we've been growing for some time.  It is a green plant but may pick up some blue outdoors in sun.  The caudex is about 12 inches and a small pup is forming (the fourth photo).  I apologize but I don't have any pictures of a mature habitat plant and there are none on the internet.  In addition to this 15g, I also have some citrus pot sized plants for sale.
Dioon jicala hidalgo Dioon jicala hidalgo
Dioon jicala hidalgo Dioon jicala hidalgo Dioon jicala hidalgo
Dioon jicala hidalgo    

 

 

TRITHRINAX CAMPESTRIS
BLUE, SUCKERING, COLD HARDY FAN PALM

I talked about this species recently, but wanted to mention it again because it is so rare to see plants like this available.  We have super blue 5g and 15g plants presently.  These take hot, blazing sun, will live in the desert, are cold hardy into the mid-teens F., and can be grown in humid areas like TX or FL.  Shown here are both of the sizes we have available. 
Trithrinax campestris Trithrinax campestris
Trithrinax campestris Trithrinax campestris Trithrinax campestris

 

CERATOZAMIA SPECIES
A CYCAD WITH AN EXOTIC APPEARANCE

Shown here is a large Ceratozamia species in a 15g pot with about six foot leaves.  There are quite a few Ceratozamia plants which don't key out nicely into a definite taxonomic species.  This is one of those plants.  It has a caudex size of nine inches and an overall crown width of eight feet.  Lots of people love this genus because they are exotic and tropical appearing.  We have a great assortment of these for sale from large to small. 

Here are a few general comments about Ceratozamia:

Along the coast, most like filtered light
Leaflets vary from thin to wide
Leaves are sometimes dependent, hanging downward
Petioles are armed with small spines
Cones have spines of them
Caudexes never get very large, rarely over two feet
Sometimes newly emerging leaves are red or brown
Cold tolerance on many is down to the lower 20's F.
They are typically not fast growing

With these characteristics, sometimes this is the perfect cycad to put under overhead canopy to make the garden floor appear more lush and exotic.  Over time, I'll show more interesting plants of this genus.  
 
.
Ceratozamia species 15g Ceratozamia species 15g
Ceratozamia species 15g Ceratozamia species 15g  

 

SANSEVIERIA HALLII
SMALL AND DIFFERENT COMPANION PLANT

From time to time, I like to show other types of plants, many of which fall into the "Companion Plant" category.  Sansevieria, related to Agave, are such a plant.  They are known for natural variegation with banding/striping of their leaves.  Leaves tend to be upright, have mottled colors or stripes, and have a preference for sun.  Sometimes the leaves are flexible and bend.  Other times they are thick and robust.  Sansevieria do not form trunks.  Sansevieria hallii get to about 2 feet tall, like good draining soil, prefer full sun and tolerate a freeze.  Shown here is this species with its thick, green and silver leaves.  This is an unusual appearing species that most people haven't seen.  If well received, we might start carrying more Sansevieria of rare types.  This is a special order plant but can be obtained quickly from one of my suppliers.  The last photo is a blossom of this same plant.  I've been informed that, although rarely, they do blossom.
Sansevieria halliiSansevieria hallii
Sansevieria hallii Sanseveria blossom
   

 

BRACHYCHITON RUPESTRIS
TREE WITH LIGHT CANOPY AND INTERESTING TRUNK

About three decades ago I visited Seaborne Nursery up in the Lake Hodges area of San Diego County.  It has long since vanished as a nursery.  A fellow who ran this nursery, Bill Seaborne (now deceased) convinced me to try a few of this interesting species.  I planted them and within about five to ten years found they have the most peculiar, large and swollen trunks.  The leaflets are quite fine; but the trunk is massive.  The trunk has a green snake skin type of texture and is a fast growing tree.   I have a few 15g trees and some 5g plants for sale.  The 15g size is shown here.  I am also showing you pictures of mature trees off the Internet.  This species is not known for flowers, but rather for it's peculiar swollen trunk.  It can get to fifty feet tall, likes sun, and has a cold tolerance that is probably into the low 20's F.  
Brachychiton rupestris Brachychiton rupestris

Brachychiton rupestris Brachychiton rupestris by Adelaide Zoo, Australia website
by Adelaide Zoo website, Australia

 

PTYCHOSPERMA ELEGANS
THE SOLITAIRE PALM
PECULIARLY CALLED THE "ALEXANDER PALM"

Ptychosperma is a group of pinnate palms from Australia, PNG and various Pacific islands.  There are single trunk and suckering varieties.  All are crown shafted.  The hallmark for identifying this species is the leaflets.  All have a jagged, chopped off terminal leaflet.  In other words, the leaflet tips don't come to a pointed end but rather a notched or jagged end.  Ptychosperma elegans is one of the most cold hardy species of this group.  They get a thin trunk, a somewhat silver crown shaft and a medium sized crown of leaves.  Cold tolerance is into the mid to upper 20's f.  They prefer to "work their way" into the sun.   So, planting in strong filtered light would be ideal if they can grow up into the sun over time.  Inland areas would require filtered light at all times.  They are a medium rate grower.  Planting in clumps can be attractive.  Shown here are examples of 15g and 5g plant material at the nursery.  I have a very nice plant in my garden that is about 25 feet tall and gets eastern light.  Also shown are some mature plants in gardens.  The fourth photo was taken by HJD.  The last photo demonstrates the terminal portion of the leaflets and their jagged edge.  This photo is of a P. schefferi, another nice species.

Finally, I would like to mention that some people call this the
Alexander Palm. This is totally confusing as there is another palm, Archontophoenix alexandrae, which is called the same.  I'd consider this a terrible common name for this species as it just confuses the customer.  No real palm enthusiasts call it by this name.  If a nursery calls it this, figure they don't know better.  Perhaps, historically, some palm importer couldn't tell the difference between the two species and therefore gave it this name. 
Ptychosperma elegans Ptychosperma elegans
Ptychosperma elegans Ptychosperma elegans Ptychosperma schefferi leaflets

 

CERATOZAMIA HILDAE
A VERY COLD HARDY DWARF CYCAD

I've discussed this species before, but today I wanted to make three main points about this interesting and small cycad.  First, it is probably one of the most cold hardy of all the Ceratozamia.  It has been known to tolerate temperatures down to 17 degrees F.  The second point is that it is small in size and will fit almost anywhere in the garden.  Native to Mexico, this species prefers filtered light in most areas but can tolerate near full sun along the coast.  Its leaves never get over four to five feet and the maximal caudex size is no bigger than a cantaloupe.  It likes good draining soil and not to be overwatered.  It is also an ideal patio plant. 

Customers often see a particular leaf form and say "I want that type".  Well, it's not as easy as you'd think.  Seedling plants may not totally predict what the mature plant will look like.  If you look at all these plants, you'll notice variation in the leaves and leaflets.  Typically you see grouping of the leaflets.  But, there are forms that only have single, simple leaflets attached with little grouping.  This is the third point I wish to make: there is variation in the appearance of this species.  Some have fat leaflets, others thin.  Some have six leaflets per grouping, others just two.  Some leaflets are long and thin, others short and compact.  But, they are all charming and quite cute.  We can easily ship one of them right to your door.   Just give us a call.
Ceratozamia hildae Ceratozamia hildae
Ceratozamia hildae Ceratozamia hildae Ceratozamia hildae
Ceratozamia hildae Ceratozamia hildae Ceratozamia hildae
Ceratozamia hildae Ceratozamia hildae Ceratozamia hildae

 

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

 

ENCEPHALARTOS TRISPINOSUS
A BLUE CYCAD WITH VARIATION IN COLOR AND LEAF APPEARANCE

This sought after blue cycad from the Republic of South Africa is one of the "Basic Four" blue cycads I have previously described.  (E. horridus, trispinosus, lehmanii and princeps).  It is typically blue in color, loves sun, and is very slow growing.  A plant with a three foot trunk would be considered huge.  It's leaves are typically three feet long, sometimes a bit longer.  Cold tolerance is about 22 degrees F.

However, what I want to tell you about today is that this, of these four species above, is by far the most variable.  In the wild there are blue forms and green forms.  And, leaflets vary from the classic prominently lobed variety to lanceolate leaves with almost no barbs on the margins.   You might mistake it for an E. lehmanii, but when the plant cones it becomes apparent that it's a trispinosus.  All plants will have the gold colored collar at the base of the leaf stem as shown in the fourth photo.  The third photo shows the classic leaf.  Remember, the name "tri"-spinosus describes the fact that typical leaves have "three" spines on the leaflets, counting the terminal spike.  But, I must stress, in about half of the plants you see this will not be the case.  One photo below shows an almost spineless leaf form. 

The first four photos here are all the same plant.  These are followed by photos of an assortment of plants.  These show the variation in leaflet form.  Because of this diversity in form, it is a highly collectible species.  Believe it or not, some prefer the green form the most.  All are attractive.  We have a pretty good supply of them for sale, all sizes.
Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus
Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus
E. trispinosus cit pot size
Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus
Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus
Encephalartos trispinosus Encephalartos trispinosus
green form of E. trispinosus
Encephalartos trispinosus

 

ENCEPHALARTOS MANIKENSIS
A GREEN CENTRAL AFRICAN CYCAD
ANOTHER "VARIABLE" SPECIES

This species from Zimbabwe, Africa, has always been a bit of a confusion because this area has several similar species and identifying them taxonomically was difficult.  For this reason, a few decades ago, plants were considered to be in the "Manikensis Complex".  Other put into this group later became species such as E. gratus, E. chimanimaniensis, concinus, bandula, etc.  Encephalartos manikensis is a medium sized cycad.  Trunks can get up to three or even five feet tall.  Clustering does occur.  Leaves are about six feet long, leaflets one inch wide.  Leaves are held upright at about a 45 degree angle. 

As it is a Central African cycad, one will find that it does better with humidity than some of the South African species and is not quite as cold hardy.  For this reason, it does quite well in the SE areas of the U.S. where cold is not an issue.  It will tolerate a freeze and can usually take temperatures down into the mid-twenties.  At our nursery, plants has easily withstood temperatures of 25 degrees F. without any problems.  Sun exposure is another issue that you must consider.  Along the coast, full sun is tolerated well.  In inland locations, consider part day sun.  In desert areas, filtered light would be best.  I'm showing here a whole assortment of plants, from boxed specimens to seedlings.  Also shown is a garden specimen.  We have a good supply of this species in all sizes for sale.
Encephalartos manikensis 15g Encephalartos manikensis 15g
E. manikensis box E. manikensis leaf E. manikensis leaves

 
E. manikensis box Encephalartos manikensis band E. manikensis garden

 

CERATOZAMIA PLUMOSA
AKA CERATOZAMIA NORSTOGII
A SMALLER CYCAD WITH A "FLUFFY" LEAF

This thin leaf cycad from Mexico has gone through various name changes over the years.  I prefer the name "plumosa' because it is so descriptive.  The leaves of this species are plumose.  The leaflets are three to five inches long and attached at various angles on the rachis.  The leaflets actually twist on the stem axis giving this species a fluffy appearance.  When the plants are young (see photos 3-4) they are often displayed in one plane; i.e., they appear more flat.  But, over time, the twisted, fluffy leaf appearance does develop.

Along our coast here in Southern California, this species tolerates full sun.  Inland areas may require filtered light.  Cold tolerance is down into the low 20's F.  Mature size is not large.  A very old specimen may have a trunk of twelve inches.  Leaf length is about four feet.  Shown here are several plants of various sizes.  We do have some seedlings on up to perhaps a few boxed specimens for sale.
Ceratozamia plumosa Ceratozamia plumosa
Ceratozamia plumosa Ceratozamia plumosa Ceratozamia plumosa
Ceratozamia plumosa Ceratozamia plumosa  

 

PRITCHARDIA, THE GENUS
THE HAWAIIAN PALM AND THE ONLY PALM TRULY NATIVE TO HI

This genus is mostly native to Hawaii, but some species extend into the South Pacific.  In fact, the only palm truly native to the HI Islands if Pritchardia.  At our nursery, we specialize in the native species of Pritchardia that are from Hawaii because they are more cold tolerant and easier to grow in Southern CA..  All are tropical fan palms and all are very desirable.  For those of you who "only like feather palms", think again.  These plants are gorgeous and add a real diversity to the garden.  There are about 25 or so species in this genus, and at any time we typically offer ten or more species for sale.  They tend to be small to medium sized palms, typically under 20 feet of height with thin or medium sized trunks.  The leaves are near entire and often flat in their shape.  They are easy to grow and some tolerate
temperatures into the mid-twenties F.  In coastal areas they take full or part day sun.  Inland they may be grown in strong filtered light. 

We have all sizes from seedlings, medium sized plants on up to boxed specimens.  Shown here are an array of sizes and species.  Come visit us and you'll be pleasantly surprised to see that we have hundreds of this genus for sale.  Over the past 3 decades we have sold thousands of Pritchardia  of all species and everyone loves them.  We are one of the only nurseries in the country that offers so many species and sizes of Pritchardia.   Once again,  Pritchardia are the only true palm species native to the Hawaiian Islands.  All other palm species were introduced by man!

I am showing a few mature garden and habitat plants here.  Note how some are quite tall (P. schattaueri) and others don't get over about ten feet.  Some have very flat leaves, others are wavy.  Some have small leaves, others as big as a dinner table.
  
Pritchardia


Pritchardia seedling
pritchardia


Pritchardia species
pritchardia leaf pritchardia pritchardia 5g
Pritchardia schauterii by A. B.
Pritchardia schattaueri by A. Bredison
Pritchardia beccariana
Pritchardia beccariana
Pritchardia beccariana box
Pritchardia beccariana box
Pritchardia species
dwarf species, 15 years old
Pritchardia martii
Pritchardia martii
Pritchardia hardyi
Pritchardia hardyi


ZAMIA LEAF APPEARANCE

There is a tremendous array in the appearances of the leaves of this genus.  In terms of orientation, some are very upright. 
Others, like Zamia pseudoparastitica, are very dependent and hang downwards, way below the stem.  Many new leaves
as they flush from the stem are green.  But, others are gold, bronze, brown or red emergent.  These colors are transient and
typically revert to a green color over time.  Leaf length can be as short as one foot long in some dwarf species.  Others have
leaves of six or more feet.  Leaflet appearance is also variable.  Most species have serrated edges, but many are smooth
without teeth.  Pictures below will show the variation in the appearance of leaves.  Of note, some of the most sought after
species have wide, exotic leaflets.  The leaf stems of Zamia are typically armed with small spines.  Some species have
almost or completely smooth petioles.  One species shown below, Zamia picta (Z. variegata), has variegated yellow splotches
on the leaflets.  Below are pictures of an assortment of Zamia leaves.  I hope you like them. 

Zamia cremnophila leaves
Zamia cremnophila leaves

Zamia dressleri newly emergent leaf
Zamia elegantissima leaves
Zamia elegantissima leaves 
Zamia muricata leaf
Zamia muricata leaf 
Zamia picta leaf
Zamia picta leaf 
Zamia skinneri red form leaves
Zamia skinneri leaves 
Zamia splendens leaf
Zamia splendens leaf 
Zamia vasquezii leaves
Leaves of Zamia vasquezii 
Zamia obliqua
Zamia obliqua 
Zamia pseudoparasitica
Zamia pseudoparasitica in a basket
Zamia kickxii
Zamia kickxii
Zamia skinneri Robert Martin
Zamia skinneri, red emergent by R. Martin

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013

 

CERATOZAMIA MEXICANA
EXOTIC FILTERED LIGHT CYCAD

This extremely popular filtered light cycad is native to the state of Veracruz in Mexico.  It has long and lush leaves that come out of the caudex in a upward direction and then genrally arch downwards.  Stem size can reach three feet and leaf length can be up to six feet.  Leaflet length can be over one foot long and there are typically forty leaflets per leaf.  As shown here, leaflets come to a point and are straight or sometimes falcate in shape.  Leaflet width is typically under one inch and color is green. 

In general, I recommend filtered light for this species.  It is a great cycad to "sneak" into a spot under the canopy of other trees.  One photo below shows it used this way.  Or, it can be a stand alone specimen as seen in another photo here.  Cold tolerance is well into the low 20's F. and this species is easily being grown in the San Francisco Bay Area.  In mild coastal areas, some have grown it in full sun.  Many areas find that morning sun is an ideal growing environment. 

Shown here is a good sized 5g plant and some garden specimens  We have a nice supply of this species for sale from seedlings on up to large boxed specimens.
Ceratozamia mexicana Ceratozamia mexicana
Ceratozamia mexicana Ceratozamia mexicana Ceratozamia mexicana
Ceratozamia mexicana Ceratozamia mexicana Ceratozamia mexicana

 

SOME NICE BLUE PALMS AND CYCADS ON SPECIAL BELOW!!

BRAHEA ARMATA
COLD HARDY, LOVES HOT SUN
TEN DAY SPECIAL 5G SIZE


This single trunk fan palm is native to Baja California and often called the Mexican Blue Fan Palm.  It loves heat and sun and is xerophytic to some degree.  The leaf color is intensely blue.  Cold tolerance is about 15 degrees F.

REGULAR PRICE 5G $65
TEN DAY SPECIAL $45


You must mention this Blog Only special when purchasing in order to get this price. 
bRAHEA ARMATA bRAHEA ARMATA

 

TRITHRINAX CAMPESTRIS
COLD HARD, BLUE AND SUCKERING
TEN DAY SPECIAL 15G SIZE


This suckering, blue South American fan palm is very slow growing.  Our special is on 15g plants that are suckeirng and about eight years old.  Their color is dramatic.  This species loves heat and sun, can grow in the desert and is cold tolerant into the mid-teens F.

REGULAR PRICE 15G $185
TEN DAY SPECIAL THIS SIZE $150


You must mention this Blog Only special when purchasing.
Trithrinax campestris Trithrinax campestris

 

BISMARCKIA NOBILIS
LARGE, BLUE FAN PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL


I'm offering our 5g plants of this great Madagascar palm species.  This is a brilliantly blue palm that, in many decades, can get to over forty feet of height.  It has large, flat leaves.  Cold hardiness is about 22 degrees.  It loves sun and heat.  On sale are our 5g plants.

REGULAR PRICE 5G $65
TEN DAY SPECIAL $45


Mention this Blog only price when ordering.
Bismarckia 5g Bismarckia nobilis

 

COPERNICIA ALBA
THE CARANDAY PALM
TEN DAY SPECIAL 15G SIZE
 

This is probably the most cold hardy of any of the Copernicia.  It is native to the South American countries of Bolivia, Paraguay and Argentina.   We just got in some very nice 15g plants, so I thought I'd present the species here.  It is a very tall palm (can get up to 100 feet) yet has an extremely thin trunk, usually less than 12 inches.  The upper trunk can hold on to old leaf bases, but on older specimens most of the trunk shows a clean gray appearance.  The leaves are about three feet wide, green above and blue-green to blue below.  The deeply divided leaves are about three feet wide..  Petioles are mildly armed.  Photos here show the leaf characteristics.

Like other tall, thin palms, this species can be planted in a group of several together.  It wants full sun and is cold hardy well into the lower twenties and even the upper teens F.  It can tolerate desert climates.  We also have available smaller plants for sale.  If you compare this to the Copernicia baileyana I've discussed previously. the two are totally different appearing palms within the same genus.

REGULAR PRICE 15G $175
TEN DAY SPECIAL $150
Copernicia alba 15g Copernicia alba 15g
Copernicia alba 15g Copernicia alba 15g Copernicia alba 15g
Copernicia alba 15g Copernicia alba 15g Copernicia alba 15g
Copernicia alba 15g    

 

ENCEPHALARTOS HORRIDUS
BLUE AFRICAN CYCAD
TEN DAY SPECIAL BAND SIZE


This is the most sought-after cycad we sell.  Native to South Africa, it never gets very big and loves heat and sun.  It' a full sun species along the Coast and part day far inland.  Cold hardiness is about 22 degrees F.  It is slow growing.  We'er offering nice 2 yo seedlings on sale.

REGULAR PRICE BAND SIZE $55
TEN DAY SPECIAL $45


You must mention this Blog Only Special when purchasing.
eNCEPHALARTOS HORRIDUS BAND Encephalartos horridus garden

 

BUTIA ERIOSPATHA
GREEN BUTIA SPECIES
TEN DAY SPECIAL 5G SIZE


This single trunk pinnate palm from Brazil does not have the gray or blue color to the leaves that you see with capitata.  The flower spathes are wooly and the overall height is about fifteen feet.  It likes sun and is cold hardy into the teens F.  It's a bit hard to get your hands on one.

REGULAR PRICE 5G $65
TEN DAY SPECIAL $50


you must mention this Blog only special when ordering.
Butia eriospatha Butia eriospatha

 

ZAMIA SPECIES "DWARF CUBA"
A MINIATURE CYCAD


The most famous of all cycads from Cuba is the Microcycas calocoma.   However, there are several dwarf Zamia species that are extremely rare and also from Cuba.  Shown here is a citrus pot, coning sized plant that is one from Cuban origin. 

It is largely recognized that Zamia pygmaea and kickxii are the two dwarf species from Cuba.  Zamia kickxii has more rounded and clover leaf-shaped leaflets.  Z. Pygmaea leaflets are more narrow.  The plant shown here would be more like the classical Zamia pygmaea although I cannot confirm that this plant is that species specifically.  So, we just call it "dwarf Cuba".  It is a small cycad with leaves under two feet.  It forms a small caudex and will, like this plant, cones with a cuadex size under two inches.  I have also shown the band size from an older picture.  It likes filtered light and is probably cold tolerant into the upper twenties F.  We only have a few of these for sale.
Zamia species dwarf Cuba Zamia species dwarf Cuba
Zamia species dwarf Cuba Zamia species dwarf Cuba Zamia species dwarf Cuba
     


TO READ EARLIER POSTS FROM MAY, 2013 CLICK HERE

CHECK BACK FREQUENTLY AS MORE FEATURED PLANTS WILL BE ADDED EVERY FEW DAYS..

 

CLICK ON DATES BELOW FOR OLDER PARTS TO THIS THREAD


You are on Current Time Blog (this page)

To Read more Blog threads, click on posting dates below: 

May, 2013
April, 2013

March, 2013
February, 2013

January, 2013
December, 2012
November, 2012

September-October, 2012
July-August, 2012
May-June, 2012
March-April, 2012
January-February, 2012
November-December, 2011
September-October, 2011
June-August, 2011

 

THIS IS A HUGE WEBSITE.  CLICK ON THE HOME BUTTON BELOW TO SEE  OVER FIFTY ARTICLES AND 5000 PHOTOGRAPHS.     

THANK YOU FOR READING THIS BLOG.  I HOPE YOU VISIT US AGAIN.  

Phil Bergman

Owner, Jungle Music Palms and Cycads  

 

Home Contents Palms Cycads Directions

 Mailing List Clip Art      To be added to our mailing list click here.. Receive quarterly species lists and announcements of Jungle Music's famous Open House Sales!

Email Image Send mail to phil.bergman@junglemusic.net with inquiries about Jungle Music nursery stock or mail order.  CLICK HERE TO EMAIL PHIL

© 1997--2013 Jungle Music Palms and Cycads
Last modified: July 05, 2013

  All major credit cards accepted